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NORTHWESTERN ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC.


June 2015 Stay connected by updating your contact information I


n the utility business, we know rough weather will occur, and sometimes power outages simply


can’t be avoided. But did you know there are steps you can take to ensure your electricity is restored as quickly and safely as possible? By keeping your contact information up to date, you can take full advantage of the ser- vices Northwestern Electric offers. To report an outage, you can use our outage texting service, smart phone app, website or call us. No matter which method you choose, we use the phone number you provide to link your service address to our outage manage- ment system. Our automated system recognizes your phone number and can determine the particular service ad- dress from which you are reporting an outage.


But remember—this only works if your current phone number is linked to your address. Please take a moment to fill out the form and return to us to make sure you’re up to date. Help us keep you connected.


Name on Account _________________________________________ Account # _______________________________________________ Business Phone # _________________________________________ Home Phone # ___________________________________________ Mobile Phone # __________________________________________ Other Phone # ____________________________________________ Email address ____________________________________________ Mail to: NWEC


or drop by: NWEC P.O. Box 2707 Woodward, OK 73802 Woodward Office


2925 Williams Ave. Woodward, OK


You can also send an email with the information to kaylie.cole@nwe- cok.coop or fax to 580.254-2858 Attention: Kaylie.


Powering safely with generators during an outage O


ne of the great things about the modern American electric grid is that power almost always flows when we need it. Given our dependence on electricity, it’s understandable why portable generators are popular when the power goes out and stays out for a while. But generators can cause more harm than good if not used properly. We want to give you a few safety tips to protect yourself and our linemen who are working to restore your power. First, never, ever plug a portable generator directly into one of your home’s outlets—unless you have had a double throw switch installed at your home. If you don’t have a double throw switch, power provided by the generator can backfeed along power lines, which can electrocute a lineman working on those lines.


In addition, portable generators create carbon monoxide, the odorless,


colorless gas that can quickly be deadly if the generator isn’t exhausted outside. Attached garages with an open door don’t count—the carbon monoxide can still seep indoors and poison inhabitants. Generators must go outside in a dry area, which might mean you’ll need to rig a canopy to protect if from precipitation at a safe distance from your home’s windows, doors, and vents. How far is a safe distance? Even 15 feet can be too close.


Make sure you plug appliances directly into the generator using heavy-duty, outdoor-rated extension cords, but don’t overload it. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for maximum load. Shut off the generator before refueling, or a fire could start— and it’s a good idea to have a fully charged fire extinguisher nearby, just in case.


Another thing to keep in mind is making sure you have a properly


sized generator to handle your power generation needs during an outage. While there is no substitute for having a certified electrician perform an inspection and calculate everything for you, Northwestern Electric has a brochure that can help you get started in the right direction.


Safety is a top priority at North-


western Electric for our employees and members alike. Contact us at 580.256.7425 or 800.375.7423 if you’d like to learn more about how to properly size, install and use a portable generator. (3983001)


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