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Geocaching Lingo


BYOP – “Bring your own pen.” Some caches will have this acronym attached to the virtual log. Madaffari says it’s always a good idea to take a pen. “If you don’t write your name in the log, it doesn’t count as a fi nd,” she says.


DNF – “Did not fi nd.” If a cache’s virtual log contains several DNF reports, chances are it has been removed or destroyed. It’s a good idea to check the virtual log before heading out to a site to make sure it has been found recently.


Geocache – a container hidden according to GPS coordinates, containing a log for cachers to sign when they fi nd it. Also called a “cache.”


Geocacher – a person who participates in the game of geocaching. Also called a “cacher.”


Micro cache – the smallest type of cache. They can be the size of a fi lm canister or even as small as a pencil eraser. “We were caching in Dallas and we found a micro that looked like a screw. They are the hardest and most exciting to find,” Cushman says.


Muggler – a non-cacher. Geocachers should make sure no mugglers are watching them when they locate a cache so the cache is not “muggled” (destroyed or removed).


Mystery cache – a cache that involves solving some kind of puzzle in order to locate it.


SWAG – “Stuff we all get.” Treasures left inside a geocache. Cachers can bring an item with them and trade it for an item in the cache. “We’ve found everything from small toys to foreign coins,” Cushman says. “We’ve heard of people who have found $100 bills and diamond rings.”


Trackable – A special type of geocaching game piece that has a trackable ID on it. Trackables should be moved from cache to cache. Players can see where they have traveled on geocaching.com. Types of trackables include travel bugs, which often look like dog tags, and geocoins, which resemble coins.


“I didn’t realize how fun it would be. We get exercise, it doesn’t cost anything and our family has a lot of fun.” - Jennifer Cushman, geocacher


cache and put one of ours in.” Once the fi nd has been logged, the cache is placed into its original spot for others to discover. Cushman says caching has offered her family an oppor- tunity to get off the beaten path and take in sights they might otherwise miss. Her youngest daughter, Lili, 13, is especially passionate about the sport. Lili plays on a com- petitive soccer team and the family regularly travels for her games. “Wherever we go, Lili checks to see if there’s a cache


nearby,” she says. “We were in the Oklahoma City area for a tournament and we drove home on old Route 66. There are hundreds of caches along Route 66.” Geocaching has been an educational experience as well.


Cushman says her daughters have developed map reading and compass skills, they have learned about their state by caching in small towns, and they have visited various mu- seums and historical sites. “I love to geocache with my husband and kids. I didn’t realize how fun it would be,” she says. “We get exercise, it doesn’t cost anything and our family has a lot of fun.”


High-tech hide and seek


The Blue Whale in Catoosa, Okla., is a popular attrac- tion for those traveling along historic Route 66 in north- east Oklahoma. What visitors to the landmark probably don’t realize is that a geocache is hidden at the site. Cachers come from near and far to log the cache called, “Thar She Blows!”


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