This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Oklahoma Health


ZIKA AWARE M


What you should know about the virus


By Dr. Gabriel Vidal, MD Reviewed by Dr. Steve M. Blevins, MD


ost folks have heard about the widely publicized Zika virus. Dr. Anne Schucaht, head of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), stated in early April that the Zika virus is “scarier than initially thought.” Until recently, Zika was a fairly rare tropical disease fi rst identifi ed by scientists in


the 1940s in the Zika forest in Uganda. It is transmitted by mosquitoes that currently have been found in 30 states and territories in the United States, including Oklahoma. Zika became a world celebrity with reports of outbreaks in some Pacifi c islands and southeast Asia. It is thought the virus arrived in Brazil sometime around the end of 2014 during the Brazilian summer. The virus has since been identifi ed in several countries across North, Central, and South America, including the United States. As of June 1, 618 travel-associated Zika cases were reported in the United States. Out of those cases, fi ve were found in Oklahoma and 36 in Texas. Travel-associated Zika cases mean patients were found to have Zika after returning from an affected area. Zika may also be transmitted by sexual contact with an affected person and can affect infants while in utero. Oklahoma Living (OKL) interviewed Dr. Douglas Drevets, MD, professor and chief of infectious diseases at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. He earned his degree at University of Kansas School of Medicine, pursued a fellowship in Infectious Diseases at University of Colorado and obtained his Diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in London, UK.


Percentage of Zika cases


OKL: What are the chances of


Oklahoma: 0.72%, 5 cases


* Surrounding States: 8.39%, 58 cases


New York: 23.73%, 164 cases


Other States: 67.15%, 464 cases


* Surrounding States include Kansas, Missouri, Arkansas, Texas, New Mexico, and Colorado.


Source: Center for Disease Control, www.cdc.gov


10


someone contracting Zika? Dr. Drevets: If the area is Oklahoma, currently


the chance is low. This is because we don’t have mosquitoes carrying the Zika virus living in Oklahoma. It would be possible to contract Zika in Oklahoma if you were sexually involved with someone who became infected with Zika some- where else, or if you got a blood transfusion from someone who had the Zika virus. The possibility of becoming infected in the Sooner state may change if the types of mosquitoes spreading Zika virus—which exist in Oklahoma—become infected by the virus itself.


OKL: How is it transmitted?


Dr. Drevets: The virus is usually transmitted through the bite of an infected mosquito. It is possible for someone to acquire it sexually. It is more likely a woman would acquire it sexually from a man if the man had a Zika virus infection. Interestingly, current studies suggest Zika can per- sist in a man for at least 60 days after he’s had a Zika virus infection. CDC recommends if a man


has had a Zika virus infection, he should abstain from sexual activity or use condoms for at least six months after he had Zika. It may be possible for a man to contract it from a woman through sexual intimacy although that hasn’t been proven yet. It can also be transmitted by a blood transfusion if the person donated blood when they had Zika. The last way it could be transmitted is from a woman to her unborn baby.


OKL: Is there a vaccine?


Dr. Drevets: Not currently. We are hoping one can be developed soon but it will still be several years before it is offered to the public.


OKL: Have Zika mosquitoes been found in Oklahoma?


Dr. Drevets: Yes, there are two specifi c mosqui- toes that carry it. One is called Aedes aegypti and the other one is called Aedes albopictus. Both spe- cies of mosquitoes are already common in Oklahoma. So we have the mosquitoes; they are here and they are hungry.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118