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Stay Safe with and Around Irrigation Equipment “A people that values its privileges above


its principles soon loses both.” – Dwight D. Eisenhower All cooperative businesses around the world


operate in accordance with the following seven cooperative principles.


1. Voluntary and Open Membership 2. Democratic Member Control 3. Member Economic Participation 4. Autonomy and Independence 5. Education, Training and Information 6. Co-operation among Co-operatives 7. Concern for Community


Less known is the fact that cooperatives have also adopted a set of values


that helps to put these principles into practice. Cooperatives are based on the values of self-help, self-


responsibility, democracy, equality, equity and solidarity. In the tradition of their founders, co-ops believe in the ethical values of honesty, openness, social responsibility and caring for others. Let’s take a closer look at these values and see how they impact us here


at Harmon Electric Association. T e founders of Harmon Electric created it to serve the members that


use the electricity and other services we provide, and we continue to do that today. T is embodies the values of self-help, taking action and doing what needs to be done. We also know we must embrace the value of self- responsibility and be accountable to you, our member. Each member has one vote, no matter how much electricity you use. T is


ensures that democracy is practiced the way it is intended with equality for all members. T is is a key diff erence between co-ops and investor-owned companies where the number of votes you have depends on the number of shares you own. For co-op members, equity has two meanings. We strive to treat all


of our members fairly. It also means that, as a member, you have equity (ownership) in the co-op. While each co-op is autonomous, we do act in solidarity with other


co-ops and our community. We know that we can do more for you by partnering with other co-ops and like-minded organizations. Your parents were right when they said, “honesty is the best policy.” As


an owner, you have the right to expect us to act with openness and in a transparent manner. We welcome your active participation in our co-op. Cooperatives have long (and correctly) been identifi ed as the original


socially responsible business, meaning we care about the impact we have on the community while ensuring we are economically viable. We try to demonstrate our concern for the community through caring


for others every single day. By using our values in support of our principles since our founding in 1938, we have been able to serve you for the past 77 years and will do so long into the future.


HARMON ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION, INC 114 North First Hollis, OK 73550


Operating in


Beckham, Harmon, Jackson, Kiowa and Greer Counties in Oklahoma and Hardeman and Childress Counties in Texas


Member of Western Farmers Electric Cooperative Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives National Rural Electric Cooperative Association National Rural Telecommunications Cooperative Texas Electric Cooperative, Inc. Oklahoma Rural Water Association, Inc.


HARMON ELECTRIC HI-LITES - Lisa Richard, Editor The Harmon Electric Hi-Lites is the publication of your local owned and operated rural electric cooperative, organized and incorporated under the laws of Oklahoma to serve you with low-cost electric power.


Charles Paxton ......................................................................................... Manager


BOARD OF TRUSTEES Pete Lassiter ..................................................................................................District 1 Jim Reeves ....................................................................................................District 2 Lee Sparkman ...............................................................................................District 3 Bob Allen .......................................................................................................District 4 Burk Bullington ..............................................................................................District 5 Jean Pence ....................................................................................................District 6 J R Conley .....................................................................................................District 7 Charles Horton .............................................................................................. Attorney


Monthly Board of Directors meetings Held Fourth Thursday of Each Month


IF YOUR ELECTRICITY GOES OFF, REPORT THE OUTAGE


We have a 24-hour answering service to take outage reports and dispatch service- men. Any time you have an outage to report in the Hollis or Gould exchange area, call our offi ce at 688-3342. Any other exchange


area call toll free, 1-800-643-7769.


TO REPORT AN OUTAGE, CALL 688-3342 or 1-800-643-7769 ANYTIME


Irrigation electrical hazards are a growing problem in many regions of the country. In the summer heat and during dry spells, farm irrigation can be vital for profi tability. However, it is equally vital that operators know, follow, and share proper safety precautions to avoid potentially deadly electrical accidents when operating, handling, and working around the watering systems. While working around irrigation equipment - stay away and do not make contact. Keep in mind that metal and water are conductors of electricity. Aluminum irrigation pipes, while lightweight and easier to handle, are excellent conductors of electricity. To ensure safe operation of irrigation equipment, the Safe Electricity program offers the following tips: •


• • •


• •


Make sure that irrigation system wiring is properly grounded. Before the start of each irrigation season, have a qualifi ed electrician check the pump and wiring.


Store unused irrigation pipes far away from power lines or electrical equipment.


Position irrigation pipes at least 15 feet away from power lines.


Stay away from the piping during any lightning activity. Install lightning arresters to protect your equipment.


Position the water jet streams so that there is no chance of them spraying onto power lines. If this happens, the entire system could become energized, creating a danger for anyone nearby.


• Always shut off and lock the master electrical control switch before servicing the machine.


• Take some time to survey your surroundings before moving equipment. Look up and around you; note any power lines that could be close enough to come into contact with equipment - and stay away.


If fuses continually blow or circuit breakers repeatedly trip, have a professional check the wiring. This could indicate a potential electrical hazard.


• Avoid moving irrigation pipe and equipment on windy days, as a sudden gust could lift pipes into overhead power lines. This power line contact could prove fatal to a person holding the pipe.


For information on electrical safety, visit SafeElectricity.org.


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