This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Commentary Manage your peak summer usage E


Chris Meyers General Manager, Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives


lectric cooper- atives and their employees pride themselves on


maintaining reliable and affordable service year- round for your comfort and convenience. To main- tain reliability, your co-op is continuously monitor-


ing demand and dispatching generation units as needed. To maintain affordability, units are dis- patched in the most economic manner possible. The least effi cient unit is the last to be dispatched. There must be enough generation capacity avail- able to meet your needs on the hottest days. Peak days typically occur on a weekday, late in the afternoon, and after a series of several very hot days. Utility managers and planners pay close attention to peak demand. It determines when it is necessary to build the next generating unit. Members’ efforts to control peak demand can defer the need to build the next big, costly power plant. Generating units are very expensive—hun- dreds of millions of dollars, so it makes sense to defer construction as long as possible. That’s why


many co-ops have “load curtailment” or “de- mand side management” programs for large in- dustrial, commercial and, in some cases, residential members. When peak days occur, par- ticipating members are notifi ed with a request to avoid unnecessary uses of electricity. The demand side and the supply side of deliv- ering power are evolving. With a smarter grid, co-ops and their members are going to have more opportunities to work together to manage use of electricity. I believe this partnership strengthens the relationship between the co-op and its mem- bers. This summer you can help by doing simple things and by becoming energy aware. Replace incandescent light bulbs with high efficiency LED bulbs. Install the most effi cient air condi- tioner or geothermal system you can afford and keep fi lters clean. Turn unnecessary lights off and pull shades to reduce heat gain through the win- dows. Adequate insulation and a properly vented attic will also prove benefi cial. All of these things help reduce demand on the hottest days. You can get more ideas at www.togetherwesave.com. When you and your neighbors conserve on


peak days, it makes a difference for your co-op and it helps keep your bill affordable.


Electric co-ops support local schools A


Kendall Beck President, Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives


s we enter the month of Au- gust, thousands of families are


gearing up for one event: going back to school. Par- ents, children, teachers and administrative personnel are preparing for the big day. Education is crucial to ensure the future of local


communities, state, region and nation. Our lo- cal educators and administrators have a big job on their hands: to set the course for a path of learning while empowering students to become critical-thinking adults and engaged citizens. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, Oklahoma’s public school teachers are paid some of the lowest salaries in the nation. As we understand, teachers’ compen- sation refl ects the state’s K-12 funding. Despite the challenges faced by teachers and the lack of resources they may encounter, we commend all educators in their commitment, passion and drive for their investment to Oklahoma’s youth. Oklahoma’s rural electric cooperatives invest in local schools because they genuinely care about the communities they serve. In Oklahoma,


4


electric cooperatives are the only utility that has infrastructure in all 77 counties and the only joint entity that provides gross receipts taxes to school districts across the state—with over $35 million in contributions. Co-ops are grounded on Seven Cooperative Principles; two of these principles demonstrate electric cooperatives’ commitment to education. “Education, Training and Information” shows that, for cooperatives, effective distribution and communication of knowledge is vital. Co-ops are committed to providing education and training opportunities to member-owners, elected repre- sentatives, managers and employees. In addition, co-ops believe in informing the general public, particularly young people, by empowering them to become leaders in their local communities. “Concern for Community” demonstrates co-ops’ commitment to the communities they serve. Because your cooperative’s board of trustees and employees are your neighbors, they are fully in- vested in seeking opportunities to empower local schools and youth. To learn about ways the co- operative program supports your local youth and schools, contact your electric cooperative. As parents, teachers, administrators and stu-


dents of all ages go back to school, we wish them a successful and productive school year.


Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives Chris Meyers, General Manager Kendall Beck, President


Gary McCune, Vice-President Scott Copeland, Secretary Larry Hicks, Treasurer


Staff


Sid Sperry, Director of PR & Communications sksperry@oaec.coop


Anna Politano, Editor editor@ok-living.coop


Daniel Yates, Advertising Manager dyates@ok-living.coop


Kirbi Mills, Offi ce Manager kmills@oaec.coop


Hillary Barrow, Accountant/Offi ce Manager Asst. hbarrow@oaec.coop


Hayley Leatherwood, Multimedia Specialist hleatherwood@ok-living.coop


Taryn Sanderson, Editorial Intern intern@oaec.coop


Editorial, Advertising and General Offi ces P.O. Box 54309, Oklahoma City, OK 73154 Phone (405) 478-1455


Oklahoma Living online: www.ok-living.coop Subscriptions


$3.12 per year for rural electric cooperative members.


$6.00 per year for non-members. Cooperative Members: Report change of


address to your local rural electric cooperative. Non-Cooperative Members: Send address


changes to Oklahoma Living, P.O. Box 54309, Oklahoma City, OK 73154-1309.


Oklahoma Living (ISSN 1064-8968),


USPS 407-040, is published monthly for consumer-members of Oklahoma’s rural electric cooperatives by the Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives, 2325 E. I-44 Service Road, P.O. Box 54309, Oklahoma City, OK 73154-1309.


Circulation this issue: 320,671


Periodical postage paid at Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The Oklahoma Association of Electric


Cooperatives is a statewide service organization for the following electric cooperatives: Alfalfa, Arkansas Valley, Caddo, Canadian Valley,


Central Rural, Choctaw, Cimarron, Cookson Hills, Cotton, East Central Oklahoma, Harmon, Indian, KAMO Power, Kay, Kiamichi, Kiwash, Lake Region, Northeast Oklahoma, Northfork,


Northwestern, Oklahoma, Ozarks, People’s, Red River Valley, Rural, Southeastern, Southwest


Rural, Tri-County, Verdigris Valley, and Western Farmers Electric Cooperative.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150