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HYDROELE The Pensacola Dam was completed in 1940


Water Intake Spillway Gates


Penstock Did you know?


GRDA is regulated by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). In order for hydropower gen- eration to take place, a resevoir must reach specific water levels. When Oklahoma Living visited the Pensacola Dam in late June, the dam’s units were generating power. Water level was at 749 feet, which is 5 feet above the average minimum level for hydro generation in the summer (744 feet).


GRAND LAKE


PENSACOLA DAM


1 - Grand Lake O’ the Cherokees is one of the more popular tourist attractions


 Grand Lake O’ the Cherokees is one of the more popular tourist attractions in Oklahoma. The 46,500-acre lake has about 1,300 miles


in Oklahoma. The 46,500-acre lake has about 1,300 miles of shoreline, more than any other lake in the state. Different than most lakes, private ownership of land extends to the water’s edge. Visitors and residents enjoy a variety of activities on Grand, including boating, bass fi shing, swimming, scuba diving, jet and water skiing.


of shoreline, more than any other lake in the state. Different than most lakes, private ownership of land extends to the water’s edge. Visitors and residents enjoy a variety of activities on Grand, including boating, bass fishing, swimming, scuba diving, jet and water skiing.


into the turbine.


 Water from the lake enters the intake structure and flows through the six 15’ diameter penstocks at up to 2,317 cubic feet


per second each to power the Francis Turbines.


 Water travels through the penstocks and enters the scroll case under pressure where wicket gates control the amount of flow


 As the water enters the t turbine runner making it s


wicket opening to maintai


 The water driven turbine ru a shaft that connects them.


 Water exits the turbine th and flowing downstream in


2 - Water from the lake enters the intake structure and fl ows through the six


15’ diameter penstocks at up to 2,317 cubic feet per second each to power the Francis Turbines.


3 - Water travels through the penstocks and enters the scroll case under pressure where wicket gates control the amount of fl ow into the turbine.


4 - As the water enters the turbine it strikes the blades of the turbine runner


making it spin. A hydraulic governor controls the wicket opening to maintain a constant speed.


One of the original power wheels from the Pensacola Dam


6


5 - The water driven turbine runner spins the generator rotor by way of a shaft that connects them.


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