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“When you’re trying to connect with people, you have to open yourself up and be completely transparent. You’re taking a risk every single time you walk out there.” - Wade Tower, performer


“None of us look alike—one of our daughters is African American, one is Native American and the other has red hair,” Tower said. “That’s the way God put our family together. It amazes us how similar we are even though we aren’t biologically the same.” Tower performs nationwide for corporate audiences, church events, fundraisers, concerts and celebrations. His current lineup focuses on three shows: The Chairman and Friends, a tribute to Sinatra; Damn Strait, a tribute to George Strait; and Lighten Up, a show designed to bring humor and faith into the same arena. At a recent work event, Wilguess noticed the music in the background and thought the event coordinators were playing Sinatra on the radio. “When I turned around and saw my old friend, Wade Tower, on the stage I was stunned,” Wilguess said. “His voice is so pure; he is truly an incredible artist.” Being a performer involves putting yourself on the line in order to entertain the guests. “When you’re trying to connect with people, you have to open your- self up and be completely transparent,” Tower said. “You’re taking a risk every single time you walk out there.” The art of performance is powerful. It creates a connection between entertainer and guest, it offers a reprieve from day-to-day stress, and it’s the perfect avenue for storytelling.


“Even in the darkest and most stressful times, performance has helped me through,” Tower said. “Regardless of what is happening in our per- sonal lives, when I step on the stage, it all fades away for an hour and a half.”


Every person is given one story to live and one story to tell. At the end of the day, it’s what the person does with their story that truly matters. “Do what you are passionate about and don’t limit yourself—by geog- raphy or by what you imagine your own limitations to be,” Tower said. “If you want to do something, fi nd a way to do it.” For more information on Tower, visit www.wadetower.com.


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