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Time Out For Clean Power Plan


Electric co-ops applaud Supreme Court's decision to halt EPA regulations on power plants


T


he National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) welcomed the U.S. Supreme Court’s


decision on February 9 to halt implementation of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Clean Power Plan.


“Charging ahead with implementation of the Clean Power Plan would have caused immediate and irreparable harm to America’s electric co-ops,” said NRECA Interim CEO Jeffrey Connor. “Had the stay not been granted, co-ops would have been forced to take costly and irreversible steps to comply with the rule, which is a huge overreach of EPA’s legal authority."


The Clean Power Plan would require power plants to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 32 percent below 2005 levels by 2030.


Electric co-ops view the plan as a direct threat to their ability to provide affordable and reliable electricity to their members.


"Because co-ops serve 93 percent of America’s persistent poverty counties, we are especially concerned about the significant electric rate increases this would impose on families living on fixed incomes or in poverty," Conner said.


Last fall, 39 generation and transmission cooperatives joined NRECA in petitioning the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit to review and ultimately reject the Clean Power Plan. A decision in this case may come later this year or early 2017.


NRECA estimates that total compliance costs for electric co-ops could reach as high as $28 billion over the 2022-2030 compliance period.


The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association is the national service organization that represents the nation’s more than 900 private, not-for-profit, consumer-owned electric cooperatives, which provide service to 42 million people in 47 states.


RIGHT OF WAY CREWS WORKING NEAR YOU


CEC right of way crews will be trimming trees and clearing brush in the following areas throughout the summer:


• Broken Bow • Glover • Oak Hill • Golden • Valliant • Pine Creek • Rufe • Slim


If you have questions about CEC's right of way program, please contact Daren Kirkes at 800-780-6486, ext. 246.


SEND US EMAIL: Please email questions for Ask Your Co-op to: Jennifer Boling, jboling@choctawelectric.coop. Or, mail questions to Choctaw Electric Cooperative, PO Box 758, Hwy 93 North, Hugo,Oklahoma 74743.


CO-OP ASK YOUR


Q Why does CEC waste money sending kids to camp and Washington DC?


Sending kids on trips to far-flung locations may not have a lot to do with electricity, but it has a great deal to do with the term "cooperative."


Choctaw Electric is a cooperative. Co-ops are guided by seven basic principles. One of these principles is "concern for community."


Co-ops support their local communities in a number of ways. They are active in their local chambers of commerce, they participate in community events, sponsor livestock shows and athletic teams, and provide opportunities for rural teens through college scholarships and programs such as Youth Tour and Energy Camp.


CEC sends teens to Youth Tour because it promotes leadership and inspires students to be active citizens. Energy Camp for eighth graders also builds leadership skills and teaches kids about co-ops.


These opportunities expose rural students to new sites, sounds and people. Whether touring the US Capitol Building or looking out at thousands of tombstones of veterans buried at Arlington Cemetery, these experiences inspire teens to grow.


So, sending a kid to Washington DC may not prevent your next power outage, but it could produce your future community leader or even your next senator. It's one of the best ways we know of to ensure the best future for our rural communities.


CEC Inside Your Co-op | APRIL 2016 | 7


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