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The ElectraLite WE WANT YOU!


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We are looking for members who want to participate in our geothermal heat pump program. If you are build- ing a new home or have an old heat- ing or air conditioning system, you are a great candidate. Call today for a free, no obligation consultation and to see if you qualify for our rebates and WKH


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Geothermal heat pumps are just a better way to heat and cool your home. They work like other heating and cooling systems with thermo- stats and fans, but are not limited by the availability of natural gas or propane. They are very quiet, ex- tremely reliable and they keep the home comfortable throughout the


year. They can be used on any size home and can replace any type of unit that a home may currently have. The system works by pairing the heating and cooling system with a series of ground loops that extend down into the earth. By using the energy from the earth, which has a stable tempera- ture, the unit uses about 30 - 50 per- cent less energy than a conventional system. Geothermal heat pumps are WKH PRVW FRVW HIIHFWLYH HQHUJ\ HI¿- cient way to heat and cool a home. The sooner you call, the sooner we 802214300 can get you on the path to your energy savings. Remember, GO GO GEO! Call Geo-Energy Services at 1-844-GoGoGeo or 1-855-464-6436.


0DNH WKH 0RVW RI &HLOLQJ )DQV By Turning on the Fan, You can Turn up the Savings!


If you are like most Americans, you have at least one ceiling fan in your home. Ceiling fans help our indoor life feel more comfortable. They are a decorative addition to our homes and, if used properly, can help lower energy costs.


TIPS FOR MAKING THE MOST OF YOUR CEILING FANS:


1. FLIP THE SWITCH ± 0RVW ceiling fans have a switch near the EODGHV ,Q ZDUP PRQWKV ÀLS WKH switch so that the blades operate in a counter clockwise direction, effec- tively producing a “wind chill” effect. Fans make the air near them feel cooler than it actually is. In winter, move the switch so the fan blades rotate clockwise, creating a gentle updraft. This pushes warm air down from the ceiling into occupied areas of the room. Regardless of the season, try operating the fan on its lowest setting.


2. ADJUST YOUR THER-


MOSTAT ± ,Q WKH VXPPHU ZKHQ using a fan in conjunction with an air conditioner, or instead of it, you can turn your thermostat up three to ¿YH GHJUHHV ZLWKRXW DQ\ UHGXFWLRQ


in comfort. This saves money since a fan is less costly to run than an air conditioner. In the winter, lower your thermostat’s set point by the same amount. Ceiling fans push the warm air from the ceiling back down toward the living space, which means the furnace won’t turn on as frequently.


3. CHOOSE THE RIGHT SIZE


± 0DNH VXUH \RXU FHLOLQJ IDQ LV WKH right size for the room. A fan that is 36-44 inches in diameter will cool rooms up to 225 square feet. A fan that is 52 inches or more should be used to cool a larger space.


4. TURN IT OFF ± :KHQ WKH room is unoccupied, turn the fan off. Fans are intended to cool people - not rooms.


April 2016


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