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People’s Powerline | April 2016


Think Before Pulling the Plug Continued from page 1


At PEC, we believe electric water heaters are the smart choice for many reasons:


• High-efficiency electric water heaters, including heat pumps, are readily available.


• Electric water heaters are safe. They produce no carbon monoxide, and they pose no threat of combustion or explosion.


• Electric water heaters can run on power generated from a range of energy sources, including solar, wind, hydro and other renewables.


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• Electric heaters don’t lose energy from exhaust or the replacement air that circulates into and out of a house. Propane heaters require on-site storage tanks.


• Electric water heaters are easy to install. They require no expensive gas lines or exhaust flues.


• Electric heaters are quick to respond and can be very quiet.


• The cost of electricity is less volatile than it is for other fuels. The cost of propane tends to fluctuate wildly.


PEC also pays members up to $100 in rebates on new electric hot water heaters (certain restrictions apply). Visit our website at www. PeoplesElectric.coop/rebates to check program requirements for your next water heater purchase and to print a rebate application.


At PEC, we want our members to be armed with the information they need to make cost-effective investments in efficiency and safety. Good information will lead to smart choices.


John Pulley writes on consumer and cooperative affairs for the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, the Arlington, Va.-based service arm of the nation’s 900-plus consumer-owned, not- for-profit electric cooperatives.


Trees and Utilities Can Co-Exist Continued from page 1


possible for trees and utilities to co-exist for the benefit of communities and citizens.”


Led by Lee McElroy, PEC’s Director of Environmental Services and Vegetation Management and certified arborist, PEC met five requirements to be designated as a Tree Line USA utility. We follow industry standards for quality tree care, have annual worker training in best tree care practices, participate in and sponsor tree-planting and public education programs, have a tree-based energy conservation program and participate in Arbor Day celebrations.


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Although vegetation growing too close to power lines and distribution equipment causes 15 percent of power interruptions according to the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA), the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) estimates a single tree has the cooling effect of 10 room-sized air conditioners running 20 hours a day.


In order to ensure dependable service, PEC is diligent in its vegetation management. PEC crews remove and prune trees near our power lines at no cost to our members in order to keep the electric lines free of trees and brush.


If you see a tree touching an electric line or in danger of falling into the electric line or if you have questions regarding tree trimming, contact PEC at (580) 559-8482.


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Energy Efficiency Tip of the Month


Save energy and money by lowering your water heater thermostat to 120 degrees Fahrenheit. This will also slow mineral buildup and corrosion in your water heater and pipes.


Source: energy.gov


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