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Northfork Electric


Cooperative, Inc. Operating in


Beckham, Roger Mills, Washita, Greer, Custer, Harmon, and Dewey


SCOTT COPELAND GENERAL MANAGER BOARD OF TRUSTEES


Jimmy Taylor-Pres ............................. Elk City Charles Hickey-V. Pres.....................Reydon Ransom Snowden-Sec-Treas...........Erick Chris Mackey....................................... Sayre Larry Smith..................................Cheyenne Lloyd Joe Patton ............................... Sayre Danny Davis .....................................Elk City Brendon Atkinson........................Attorney


SAYRE OFFICE


Kenny Waugh................Mgr. of Marketing Lisa Dailey...................Mgr. of Office Services Jeff Mohr ................Mgr. of Acct. & Finance Kay Brown............................Adm. Assistant Richard Bowdre............... Operations Mgr.


REYDON OFFICE Barbara Swope..........................655-4557


FOR OUTAGES AFTER 5 P.M. CALL 1-800-NO-VOLTS (1-800-668-6587) or


(580) 928-3366


OFFICE HOURS 8 AM TO 5 PM MONDAY-FRIDAY


DATES TO REMEMBER READINGS MUST BE IN


NORTHFORK OFFICE BY THE 10th


OF EACH MONTH


TO BE USED FOR BILLING


ADDRESS P.O. Box 400


SAYRE, OK 73662 301 E. MAIN


Thieves sometimes think of it as a crime


that won’t hurt anybody. Someone illegally hooks into a power supply, hooks up a line that has been disconnected, or tampers with a meter to avoid recording electricity usage. The truth is that tampering with electrical equipment or attempting to steal electric power carries the potential to harm many people. The innocent consumers on the same line and utility personnel that work on those lines are all at risk when someone tampers with electricity or electrical equipment. “Power theft carries deadly risks. Many thieves have paid for the power they are stealing with their lives,” says NFEC Safety Director Heath Martin. “The danger does not end with those who are engaging in il- legal activity.”


An overload of electricity could result in extremely high voltages that may damage the appliances of paying customers. Exces- sive current that is not safeguarded by a fuse is especially dangerous. In emergency situ- DWLRQV VXFK DV ¿UHV SRZHU KDV WR EH VKXW RII WR KHOS ¿UH¿JKWHUV DQG HPHUJHQF\ PHGLFDO personnel to enter a building safely. If lines have been interfered with illegally, the lines could remain energized, endangering the OLYHV RI WKH ¿UVW UHVSRQGHUV


This institution is an equal oppor- tunity provider and employer.


From a reliability standpoint, illegal connections to power sources and attempts to divert metering devices can overload the system, cause interruptions, and compromise power quality.


Safe Electricity urges everyone to help prevent and reduce power theft: • Notify NFEC immediately if you know of an illegally connected consumer. • Do not cut the seal on your meter base or tamper with your own meter for any reason. • Apply for a legal connection if you do


not have one. • Remain aware of your surroundings and report any suspicious activities to your electric utility.


Most electrical theft crimes occur through meter tampering, bypassing meters, and tapping power lines. Other less frequent crimes include tapping into neighboring premises, using illegal lines after being disconnected, self-reconnection without consent, and electrifying fences. Possessing fraudulent electricity bills is also a federal crime and is punishable by law.


If illegal connections were curbed, more power would be available to consumers who obey the law, power quality and safety would increase, and people would experi- ence fewer service interruptions. Everyone is 12092-001 affected by power theft, and detecting and reporting illegal activity will help reduce the price paid.


For more electrical safety informa- tion, visit SafeElectricity.org, or feel free to contact NFEC Safety Director Heath Martin, at 580-928-3366.


Paying the Price of


Power Theft


By Heath Martin NFEC Safety Director


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