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The Analysis News & Opinions


Collections reassured over future of silent call rules


Collectors are confident that they will continue to receive an understanding approach from the telecoms regulator, following the results of a review into silent calls. Ofcom recently launched a consultation


on proposed changes to its ‘Revised statement of policy on the persistent misuse of an electronic communications network or service’, suggesting that the tolerance level for abandoned calls would be cut from 3% to zero. Many industry analysts believe that such a


reduction would have severe consequences for dialler technology. However, writing in this month’s CCR


Magazine, Leigh Berkley, president of the Credit Services Association (CSA), said that a party from the CSA and two industry


Since the levels of complaints from


consumers about the collection industry’s use of dialler technology was negligible, collection agencies are not considered to be part of the problem. The CSA also suggested that a distinction


between solicited and unsolicited calls may be useful and will continue in dialogue with Ofcom. Mr Berkley added: “Of course there is


specialists had recently aired their concerns at a meeting with Ofcom, and had been met with “a most positive response”. They were assured that the regulator did


not have debt collection agencies in their thinking at the time that these proposals were constructed, neither did they feel that the rules have materially changed.


many a slip twixt cup and lip, and the cup of kindness shared with Ofcom could yet spill over. “We are,


therefore, by no means


complacent, and would urge all of our members and those using diallers to respond to the consultation, which ends on 10 February, and ensure that our voice is properly heard.”


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