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SPOTLIGHT | Q&A


“I hate to be the pessimist but I cannot see any real improvement for the next few years. We may see more closures, JVs, takeovers and


acquisitions. The project forwarding sector may have to reassess its business models, overall capabilities, financial strengths and overall purpose.”


Kevin Stephens, PPG


HOW DO YOU THINK THE BUSINESS WILL DEVELOP IN THE SHORT AND MEDIUM TERM?


Svend Andersen, BBC Chartering: “Project shipping remains a people business and, irrespective of the volumes and transports out there, we must think about how customer behaviour changes in the future and what we feel we have to do in anticipation of this. I believe that developing ideas which create more customer value is critical to staying at the forefront of our market in the future.”


Sven Jansen, UECC: “As long as fuel prices remain low, the offshore business will not restart in Scandinavia, Russia and southern European countries.”


“It’s been like a rollercoaster, with more ups and downs than we can count, and not for the faint of heart.”


Murilo Caldana, FOX Brasil


Thomas Hertinger, Far East Land Bridge: “We don’t expect a big change in the short or medium-term. Iran is a good example with years of isolation, then the market was nearly open again and then, due to sanctions and foreign policy of other states, it is more or less put on hold again.”


Herbert Loesing, COLI Group: “Life goes on, so business will as well.”


Ole Schmidt, DSV: “I do not expect any market changes in the short term. We will also see consolidations within the heavy lift multipurpose segment, but I doubt that the rate levels will increase.”


Dave Roosen, R&B Global Projects: “Unfortunately there are too many virtual and impersonal aspects (online tendering, ship and cargo platforms, for example); too many young, unexperienced people that are dropped in the industry with no background nor education; and too many project forwarding groups coming from the ground like mushrooms. I hope people will realise this and the world will change again.”


Sameer Parikh, Lift & Shift: “As there is steady rise in crude oil prices and improvements in geopolitical situations, growth is expected over the next two to three years.”


“In the short-term many will be struggling and some will turn away from project logistics. There will still be opportunities for companies with the right set-up and those who can control the costs. Medium-term we believe that there will be many


opportunities and we are in general very positive.”


Thomas Bek, Blue Water Shipping Lane Farguson, Halifax Port Authority: “Non-containerised cargo is cyclical in nature.”


Trond Sjursen, Höegh Autoliners: “On the demand side there is reason for cautious optimism, some comeback in raw material prices and general modest GDP growth bodes well for developing economies. On the downside, policy issues, North Korea, uncertainty with where the USA is heading and Brexit all create uncertainty that hopefully will come to nothing, but also does nothing for business.”


Ludo Sarens, Sarens: “The peaks of 2005-2009 will never come back. In those days with such a high oil price, the priority was increasing production as fast as possible, and the cost was secondary. Now investment has dropped dramatically and everything is about the price.”


HLPFI10 | 95


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