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SPOTLIGHT | Q&A Q&A


“The world is getting smaller and throughout the globalisation


process over the last ten years in which HLPFI has been published, more and more project cargo has been moving.”


Emre Eldener, Kita Logistics


HOW HAS THE INDUSTRY CHANGED IN THE PAST TEN YEARS?


Thomas Weitmann, Brasil Projects: “I believe that in the last ten years we have seen various developments. Shippers have demanded new, safer, and more efficient equipment. SPMTs, normal axle lines, and girder bridges with capacities up to 400 tonnes, for example, have been imported [to Brazil].”


Patrick Dick, The Freight Co.: “In the last ten years, large/multinational customers in particular will throw a 100-page or so request for quotation (RFQ) at us. Some include questions regarding the political and religious situation of a country, as well as climate conditions etc. This is more the work of a consultant than of a logistics provider. More often than not this information is expected to be provided for free. Then comes the request to be 100 percent compliant. This is an expensive experience and one has to spend the time and money every year to stay compliant no matter whether the customer rewards us with business or not.”


Ryutaro Moto, NYK Bulk & Projects: “The industry shrank after the Lehman Brothers shock but modular sea transportation boomed from the early 2010s. The high price of oil led to the development of LNG projects, especially in Australia. Now, the oil and gas industry still suffers from weak development due to the crude oil price slump. On the other hand, demand for power generation is strong due to the electricity shortage in Asia.”


94 | HLPFI10


We asked some of our readers for their thoughts on the past ten years of the project logistics business, some of the key events seen


throughout the decade, and how they think the business will develop in the future.


“As far as the Philippines is


“If you think the last ten years of HLPFI have been tough, you ain’t seen nothing yet…The up and down of the oil price made and destroyed the market and the players.”


Ruedi Reisdorf, Fracht


concerned, the past ten years was a mixture of excitement and frustration. The entry of wind farm projects gave the


excitement, but the inconsistent policy on mining was so


frustrating…We will approach the future with cautious optimism.”


Elmer Sarmiento, Royal Cargo


Theo Kroese, Mammoet: “The most important, and consistent, trend in heavy industries in the last decade is a steady increase in competitive forces. Whether due to the 2008 financial crisis, lower oil price or political uncertainties – all players in heavy industries face intense competition, which is stronger and more demanding than ten years ago. As a consequence, project efficiency and cost- effectiveness top the agenda of construction and turnaround projects, more so now than ever before.“


Alastair Smith, Port of Vancouver USA: “The last ten years of the heavy lift industry has had its ups and downs with a disappointing finish. The oil price boom and bust was the most disruptive event of the last decade. We expect a slow recovery, but are optimistic about the business picking up in the medium term.”


Johan Boer, BigLift Shipping: “We have seen delays in final investment decisions for projects or postponement of project execution as a result of the worldwide economic situation.”


Abir Lehata, Egytrans: ”The Egyptian government’s emergency plan, which started in 2015, to develop infrastructure particularly in the power sector has been significant ... there has been a surge in megaprojects in the Egyptian market over the past two years.”


Bruce Cutillo, WCA Projects: “Some of our members are saying that project forwarding margins are getting pretty damn skinny - which continues to make it difficult for them to keep more than a few well-trained project people on staff.”


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