search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
ANALYSIS | RECRUITMENT & TRAINING


FINDING THE RIGHT PEOPLE


A perusal of the past 59 issues of HLPFI brought an old adage to the fore – the more things change, the more they stay the same. Never has this been more relevant than when considering the challenges of recruitment and training.


BY YVONNE MULDER


president, Global Industrial Projects at DHL Global Forwarding, said: “Graduates leaving school or university are typically attracted to the finance or IT sector and do not appear to be aware of the exciting and most interesting profession our sector is. “Its varied international dealings, with different countries posing increasingly complex challenges, do not seem to be known by the public. Tere are still people who think a forwarder is a truck driver or a person sitting under a railway arch producing bills of entry. Here, our industry needs to compete for available talent with the banks. “In order to meet such challenges and play the role our


T


industry needs to play, we need to attract talent of the highest calibre to continue on a road that has seen a spectacular development in my working life,” he declared. Giles Large, HLPFI editor at that time, stated: “I have a


feeling this topic will run and run.” Never was a truer word spoken, given the evidence of the past ten years. Writing for HLPFI in 2009, Barney Weston and Russell


Quinton at recruitment agency Oceanic Resources International, said: “Te general freight and shipping sector


he first issue of HLPFI highlighted the adage that the more things change, the more they stay the same. Industry stalwart Peter Ferdinand, then senior vice


has long had a reputation for not investing sufficiently in new talent. Recruiting will always be difficult in any sector suffering from a skills shortage.” In other industries this usually results in the employer being more flexible about the skills and experience required in candidates. But the nature of heavy lift shipping is such that employers often have no option but to be very specific about their requirements. Te training of staff dovetails with recruitment. One of the oldest jokes in the business world continues to ring as true today as it ever has: Two managers are talking about training their employees. Te first states: “What if we train them and they just leave?” Te second responds: “What if we don’t train them and they stay?” Te safest and most cost-efficient solution is often to


promote from within. For example, deugro has run training courses for over 20 years, developing internal resources to fill its managerial positions, said Dominik Stehle, executive vice president, deugro Group. “Project logistics is not taught in school and our unique trainee programme is imperative to the company’s success. We also run lots of workshops and hold regional meetings to keep everyone up to date. “We always have 15 trainees who go around the world for


two years, spending three months at each location to learn all aspects of project logistics.”


HLPFI10 | 81


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102