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SPOTLIGHT | TRANSPORT ENGINEERING


different jobs. Nowadays, cost and time pressure means that they cannot afford this luxury anymore,” said Alain Faymonville, managing director of Luxembourg-headquartered manufacturer Faymonville Group. In 2014, Faymonville Group


launched its CombiMAX modular trailers, tailored for medium/heavy-duty applications. “Existing customers wanting to move up the weight range find that they can achieve this with a CombiMAX without running the risk of having a big trailer that is under- utilised. Tey can adapt the trailer for different jobs, using the relevant components as required. Also, some bigger operators that have heavy modular equipment in their fleet find that the lighter CombiMAX system is more flexible.” In 2017, Faymonville reached an


agreement to purchase Italian trailer manufacturer Industrie Cometto, which specialises in the SPMT market. One trend that has become


particularly obvious in the last ten years is the combination of lower deadweights with higher payloads, explained Rainer Auerbacher, general manager of Germany-headquartered Goldhofer.


“We have taken advantage of innovations in terms of materials and design engineering to achieve reductions in weight. As a result our customers now benefit from efficient solutions to transport heavier items using the simplest possible vehicle configurations that are fully compliant with the relevant road transport regulations. Another significant trend can be seen in the focus on flexibility, on vehicles designed for the widest possible range of applications.” Goldhofer has introduced a range of


products over the past decade, notably the Faktor 5 – a high girder bridge that can be converted into a vessel bridge system; 500-tonne loads can be transported on routes with challenging profiles, said Auerbacher. HLPFI also reported on the launch of Goldhofer’s state-of-the-art ADDrive system in 2016, which combines the characteristics of self-propelled and towed modules in a single vehicle. We have also seen widening trailers take to the stage in certain regions, enabling users to comply with differing weight and width restrictions on roads throughout Australia, South Africa and the USA, for example.


Te growth of the wind energy business has dovetailed with an increase in transport solutions for wind turbine components, with a new trailer system – dubbed Tower-Bridge – launched in 2014; Dutch trailer manufacturer Nooteboom introducing its TELE-PX Super Wing Carrier (pictured on page 73), designed to transport wind turbine rotor blades, in 2010; and Mammoet completing its first delivery of a wind turbine tower in a vertical position to a jobsite in 2016.


Regulations We have seen heavy haulage associations around the world – such as the USA’s Specialized Carriers & Rigging Association (SC&RA), European Association of Abnormal Road Transport and Mobile Cranes (ESTA) and other regional and national associations – work hard to address some of the challenges that specialised transport providers continue to face on the world’s roads and heavy lift operators experience at project sites around the globe. With so many different continents and countries (and even regions) – all with different regulations – the


74 | HLPFI10


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