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SPOTLIGHT | TRANSPORT ENGINEERING


lifting and transport providers has a positive impact on a project’s quality and efficiency.


Super-heavy cranes Innovation in equipment and technology has dominated pages of HLPFI over the past ten years. ALE is now lifting 3,000-tonne modules almost on a regular basis, whereas ten years ago it was more like 1,000 to 1,500 tonnes. “So we have developed super-heavy cranes. Our two 5,000-tonne capacity cranes are recognised as the largest land-based cranes in the world,” Birch says. In 2008, HLPFI reported that ALE


had launched the AL.SK190 crane – at the time the world’s largest land-based crane; in 2012, the UK-based company announced the launch of the 5,000- tonne capacity AL.SK350 crane; while in 2016, ALE unveiled plans to launch a new 8,000-tonne capacity crane, the AL.SK700. Ludo Sarens, president of Sarens,


agreed that cranes have been increasing in capacity at all levels. “Modules are becoming bigger so we need the equipment to handle that...We need to find a solution for gravity. Tat is what we do.” Construction of Sarens’ 3,200-tonne


capacity SGC-120 crane was completed in 2011; in 2012, HLPFI reported that the crane had completed its first project, lifting components for a high-tech manufacturing facility in Arizona, USA. In 2017, Sarens revealed its SGC-140, which can lift 1,000 tonnes at a 100 m radius.


Despite the financial uncertainty


shrouding global markets, in 2011 Mammoet also introduced its PTC 120 DS, offering a safe working load (SWL) of 3,200 tonnes. Another headline model, which we


reported on in 2011 was the Liebherr LR 13000 crawler crane. Liebherr’s flagship unit has a maximum lifting capacity of 3,000 tonnes at 12 m outreach. We also saw Terex steadily


grow the capacity of its legendary CC 8800-1 crawler crane. Chinese manufacturers followed suit


in high capacity crane releases, with the launch of Zoomlion’s 3,200-tonne capacity ZCC 3200 and Sany’s 3,600- tonne capacity SCC 8600 TM crawler cranes in 2011. 2013 also marked the delivery of Manitowoc’s highest capacity crawler crane, the 31000. Portside, the capacity of mobile


harbour cranes has also increased. In 2008 we saw the delivery of the 600-tonne capacity Liebherr LHM 600 model to Nigeria-based oil and gas logistics company Intels. Seven years later, an 800-tonne capacity model – the LHM 800 – was delivered to Russia’s Port of Bronka. Away from crane developments there has been a growing shift towards the use of alternative lifting and transport solutions, including jacks, skids and hydraulic gantries. High capacity climbing systems and strand jacks have made the seemingly impossible, possible – often providing a more practical, safer and cheaper alternative to cranes. In 2011, HLPFI reported that ALE


had launched its Mega Jack system, which was developed in order to meet the increasing demand in the offshore industry to jack up larger and heavier oil and gas platform modules and other large structures. In 2014, ALE unveiled its Mega Jack 800.


Jacking systems We have also covered the development of Enerpac’s range of jacking systems and gantries over the past ten years, and seen their increasing use in projects across the world. In perhaps one of the most


spectacular projects we have witnessed over the past decade, in 2016, an Enerpac 4,800-tonne capacity gantry crane mounted on a jack-up barge set sail for Reunion Island, where it was used to install precast viaduct columns for a new coastal highway being built


Liebherr’s LR13000 crawler crane (launched 2010)


Goldhofer’s ADDrive system (launched 2016)


ALE’s Mega Jack (launched 2011)


Faymonville’s CombiMAX trailer (launched 2014) HLPFI10 | 71


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