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SPOTLIGHT | TRANSPORT ENGINEERING


DEFYING GRAVITY


As the past ten years have progressed, perhaps one of the most prevalent developments has been the growing trend towards modularisation in the project cargo and heavy lift market. Tis has increased demand for specialised equipment and expertise to handle the growing size of components.


BY DAVID KERSHAW


conjunction with global crane and transport manufacturers, have led the way in the development of specialised lifting equipment. Increasing regulation in the haulage of oversize cargoes by road has also prompted the release and upgrade of equipment used in the specialised transportation field. Michael Birch, global sales director


T


at ALE, agrees that one of the biggest changes over the last decade has been the spread of modularisation. “We have seen it in the offshore oil platform


70 | HLPFI10


ransport engineering companies - such as ALE, Mammoet, Sarens and Fagioli – in


industry since the 1980s but it didn’t take off for onshore projects on such a large scale until the last 10-15 years.” Tis expansion has been partly driven


by the development of mega projects, especially in the LNG sector, he explained. “Tis means we have bigger pieces and more of them. You can see the logic – the more work you do in one fabrication yard, the more you benefit from the skilled workforce, the processes get slicker and the costs go down.” Lars Lamet, manager of sales, logistics and terminals at Mammoet, said that the company has experienced an increased awareness from its


customers that a project’s success hinges on an integrated logistics approach. “Engineered heavy lifting and specialised transport of oversized and heavy cargo are right on the critical path of a project in many cases. Even if they are not, they can have a significant impact on timelines and costs. Hence, we see that heavy lifting and transport engineering and planning becomes involved earlier in projects – particularly in, for example, factory-to- foundation projects.” Lamet added that such early


collaboration between construction engineers, project planners and heavy


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