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REVIEW | 2011-2012


“The project forwarding


business is in a state of flux and seems destined for a phase of significant restructuring and


consolidation as a result of the financial meltdown that the


world has been through over the last four years.”


HLPFI (in 2012)


UK; DSV buying Wasa Logistics; and UK-based Collett & Sons acquiring MDF Transport’s wind turbine transportation division. Personnel changes defined much of 2011 and 2012, with a number of arrivals and departures at the top of the project logistics and specialised transportation sector. Alongside the departure of Beluga’s Niels


with JP Morgan. Meanwhile, the National Shipping


Company of Saudi Arabia rebranded itself Bahri; the Omani port of Duqm received its first project cargo; Bechtel and Subsea7 teamed up; Lars Rolner’s HeavyLift@Sea opened for business; Clipper Projects launched a shipping pool; Volga-Dnepr added an IL-76TD to its fleet of aircraft; and the CLC Projects network was launched. In the equipment arena, Sarens launched its SGC-120 crane, ALE introduced its second AL.SK190, and Goldhofer delivered its first Faktor 5 girder bridge, while the Van Seumeren family sold its stake in Mammoet and set up Roll-Lift as part of the Roll Group,


as well as establishing a new equipment provider with the launch of Re-Move.


State of flux In 2012, HLPFI wrote: “The project forwarding business is in a state of flux and seems destined for a phase of significant restructuring and consolidation as a result of the financial meltdown that the world has been through over the last four years.” While news at shipping companies stole the headlines throughout 2011 and 2012, a number of mergers and acquisitions within the logistics business hit the headlines, including the purchase of Grieg Logistics by Panalpina; Greencarrier’s acquisition of PTS


Stolberg and Fairstar’s Philip Adkins from the business (temporarily in the latter’s case), we saw the introduction of Roger Iliffe as the new ceo of Hansa Heavy Lift and the appointment of Joerg Roehl, as well as the arrival of Ulrich Ulrichs at Rickmers-Linie and Al Stanley at Intermarine. Meanwhile, Tom Griffin retired from Agility Project Logistics leaving Grant Wattmann to take the helm. HLPFI commented in 2012 on the


“worrying storms” that were closing in during some of the “toughest trading conditions in an industry admittedly defined by its cyclical nature”. However, in perhaps an apt


representation of the unsettled nature of the sector, we also reported that the industry was “glimpsing the first green shoots of recovery after an uncomfortable few years in the wilderness” in our May/June 2012 edition. Subsequent events would prove that statement somewhat wide of the mark as we moved into 2013 and 2014.


December 2012: China opens world's longest high-speed railway line January 2012: Costa Concordia tragedy off coast of Italy December 2012: Plan announced to build Africa’s largest solar power plant HLPFI10 | 39


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