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ANALYSIS | INSURANCE & COMPLIANCE


start up (DSU) coverage. Tat way there can be a balancing of costs and risks from design to delivery. Te simplest and most economical forms and sizes for construction may make for complex and expensive transportation, or vice versa. “It may seem ideal to prefabricate a component in one


piece,” Wolfe related, “but if that is very large and heavy then the move becomes restricted to only a few vessels, and to their availability. It may make more sense to fabricate in two parts that can fit on more readily available ships.”


Unconventional In some cases unconventional means of transport are being tried. In one project, a pipeline project in the Middle East, the pipe segments were a kilometre long. Rather than ship smaller segments on a vessel, the ends of the pipe segments were sealed, and the pipes were lashed together and towed on the water surface. “Ten years ago we


never saw that type of thing,” said Wolfe. “We shy away from risky moves like that. Te unconventional ideas are partly driven by freight rates or simply by size. Tere are things that just will not fit on a ship. Tere are also areas of the world that are being developed that never have before. Tat also changes pricing, as well as terms and conditions for project cargo.” Captain Andrew


Kinsey is a senior marine risk consultant with Allianz, and he has seen first hand the changes Wolfe cited. “Ten years ago I was just coming ashore after 25 years at sea. At that time heavy lift was a locomotive on an old C-5 [a Lockheed military transport aircraft]. Te biggest change I’ve seen on the survey side is the uniform safety management systems and IMO codes. Te methodologies have become much more sophisticated.”


One thing that has not changed, said Wolfe, is the


importance of loss control. “Without Andrew’s team we would not entertain the project cargo segment of marine,” he stated. “Te ex-masters are essential as we are presented with


these moves. Tat has been a constant of our underwriting.” Tat expertise has allowed for some efficiency and


economy of scale in underwriting and project management. For all the wide variability of modular and industrial projects, there are a few that have become more standard. “Onshore wind is one. Tere are similar components coming from the same manufacturers. How those components are loaded and stowed is well known. Te surveyors can monitor the first few, then spot check others.” Tat frees time and talent to some extent to focus on more


complex projects, where they are much needed. “Ten years ago we would have three to four surveys for critical equipment,” Wolfe recalled. “Now given the size and complexity of some components and the multimodal forms of transportation we may have eight or ten surveys. Tere may be road or rail moves, barge, or lift vessel. Te choreography is all in the advanced work. Tere is often a year of planning before a move.” To some owners or


fabricators it might seem like the tail wagging the dog, but Kinsey said that risk management, both planning and insurance, is an important part of comprehensive project management. “When we start on heavy lift and project cargo we look at everything from the construction onwards. Where is the steel coming from? What can go where by ro-ro vessel or barge? It


all starts with the fundamentals of lifting and loading but it ends up at sophisticated engineered cargo.” Fulvio Carlini is chairman and ceo of Multi Marine


Services based in Genoa, Italy, and also chairman of the chartering and documentary committee at the Federation of National Associations of Ship Brokers and Agents (Fonasba): “2006 to 2010 were definitely a golden age for heavy lift and project cargo.” Tis was the delivery window for a huge number of newbuild ships with lifting capacities up to 1,000 tonnes, and carrying capacity was moving past 16,000 tonnes, he recalled. “Even with the larger ships there was capacity to insure vessels and cargoes, and brokers to place the risks.”


HLPFI10 | 33


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