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SPOTLIGHT | NOTABLE PROJECTS


Since 2007, HLPFI has reported on hundreds of project moves. From the delivery of a small pipe consignment to the shipment of a huge oil rig across the globe, all of them have been complex and challenging in their own way. Here, we look back on some of the most spectacular.


RIGHT: In 2012, as part of the huge programme to expand the width of the Panama Canal, Geodis was awarded a logistics contract to coordinate the delivery of 16 new lock gates from Italy to Panama. The 16 gates, some of which weighed over 4,000 tonnes, were manufactured by Cimolai at its facility in San Giorgio di Nogaro, before being transported to the Port of Trieste using barges operated by Sarens. The gates were then shipped in four separate stages across the Atlantic on board vessels operated by both Cosco Shipping and Pan Ocean. On arrival in Panama, eight of the gates were transported on Crowley barges to the Pacific side of the canal for installation. The installation of the final lock gate - which weighed 4,232 tonnes and measured 57.6 m x 10 m x 33 m - was completed in April 2015.


LEFT: In 2012, the 114,000- tonne Costa Concordia cruise ship capsized off the Italian coast, killing 32 people. Titan Salvage, a company owned by Crowley Maritime Group, won the bid for the project to right and float the Concordia jointly with Italian marine and heavy lift contractor Micoperi. Large metal tanks weighing more than 500 tonnes, which could be filled with water, were welded onto the sides of the ship to balance the wreckage while it was dragged into an upright position using two cranes. SAL Offshore mobilised vessels Svenja and Lone to install subsea platforms, floatation sponsons and a blister tank; while Fagioli used a tower lift system and strand jacks as part of a holdback system during the recovery of the wrecked ship. Costa Concordia was then towed to Genoa to be scrapped.


28 | HLPFI10


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