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ANALYSIS | SHIPPERS & FORWARDERS


worth to the customer.” Bek says this is why BWS targets


“At the end of the day if the shipper wants to approach the carrier directly, that’s their


prerogative. We have to find a way to still add value and assist in that.”


Dennis Devlin, Schenker, Inc


cargoes and projects where it knows it can make a difference. “Where, for instance, we have a specific expertise in the region or in working with that particular cargo which will improve the whole logistics process.” Tis strategy has helped ensure that, despite the low oil prices and global economic crisis, BWS’s oil and gas and industrial projects division has continued to expand. In the last two years, BWS signed its biggest ever contracts as part of a consortium working for Tengizchevroil (TCO) in Kazakhstan. Michel Dubois, global head of energy


and project solutions, Panalpina, said his company has launched a unique multimodal carrier bill of lading which covers the whole transport from the origin to the final destination. “Te cargo owner comes to us to do the


“Lots of companies have become willing to quote large-scale projects on a net basis with an


attitude that they will try to make some money while the project is running. I don’t think this is


healthy for the industry especially because customers’ demands and the logistics providers’ risks are higher than ever.”


Patrick Dick, The Freight Co


whole project. Some owners have big logistics teams and can therefore approach the carriers directly. Others have a smaller team and want forwarders to handle 100 percent of it, including pre and post-carriage, not only the main ocean leg. We can do all of it and because we have good relationships with the customers, carriers work closely with us too.” Joerg Roehl, chief executive Europe,


Trans Global Projects (TGP), explained: “Shippers do talk directly to shipping lines but at the end of the day the carriers do not offer the full project logistics


service that providers with our expertise and professionalism can deliver. Tey might have a framework agreement and general T&Cs in place with the carrier, but then they rely on us to actually manage the project. “Clients pay us for the ability to solve


problems that inevitably crop up en route. Political problems, weather, breakdown of equipment – all need to be solved. Or if the manufacturing process is delayed, how do we reschedule to get the movement completed – and at the lowest extra cost? Tat is what we get paid for.” He added that it has not necessarily been a negative development to have direct contact between the shipper and the carrier. “It can be good to get the EPC contractor, ourselves and the shipping line engineers together at an early stage.”


Core focus Dennis Devlin, senior director at Schenker, Inc, said: “Tere is huge competition for the existing cargo base. Our approach is to work closely with our clients to understand their requirements and to have a very strong technical approach to cargo handling, stowage, finding the right ships for the cargo to make it an economical solution. “At the end of the day if the shipper wants to approach the carrier directly, that’s their prerogative. We have to find a way to still add value and assist in that. Tat's a big change we’ve seen,


“The way project forwarding services are procured has changed significantly.”


Dominik Stehle, deugro


14 | HLPFI10


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