search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
COUNTRY REPORTCANADA


Project cargo shipments through the port of Hamilton, Ontario totalled 4,300 tonnes in 2017.


handled a lot of oversize cargoes for wind farms through both Ocean Terminals and Richmond Terminals, as well as through the port of Sheet Harbour. New enquiries about the potential for offshore wind farms and tidal power projects are coming in. The port authority recently completed a CAD64 million (USD49.76 million) upgrade to Richmond Terminals to enhance its project cargo handling capabilities. An additional 500 m of new dock was developed with a 13.7 m draught; 7,000 sq m of shed space with rail doors, rail access and truck access, and 4.45 ha of laydown space.


St Lawrence ports


Other than the two major coastal ports of Halifax and Vancouver, all of the big ports in Canada are along the Saint Lawrence or Great Lakes. Although based in Canada, the St Lawrence Seaway Management Corp is scrupulously bi-national. “Oil and gas remains a big part of project cargo into Canada,” said Bruce Hodgson, director of market development for the seaway. “We have a large volume of wind turbines. The next wave of installations is going to be on the lakes. There is a large project near Cleveland already under way. Wind components are going to be strong this year.” With longer and longer blades becoming more common, Hodgson noted that


84 May/June 2018


shippers “want to keep them on the water as long as possible and get them as close as they can to the easiest land route.” Water draught along the seaway is 26 ft 9 inches (8.15 m). There a few minor airdraught restrictions, but Hodgson said those can be resolved by ballasting ships to one side. Project cargo shipments through the port of Hamilton, Ontario – southwest of Toronto and northeast of Buffalo, New York – totalled 12,000 cu m, or 4,300 tonnes, in 2017.


Both major Class 1 railways, the Canadian National and the Canadian Pacific, serve Hamilton. In 2017, the number of rail cars coming through the port reached 7,600, double the number in 2013. There is also direct highway access. “We saw an interesting range of project cargoes come through the port in 2017,” said Ian Hamilton, president and ceo of the port authority, “such as factory components, heavy construction equipment, and steel cables. The types of project cargoes handled in Hamilton are driven by the strong connection to the southern Ontario manufacturing sector, the largest concentration of manufacturing in Canada.”


We have a large volume of wind turbines. The next wave of installations is going to be on the lakes. Bruce Hodgson, St Lawrence Seaway Management Corp


Steel shipments Historically, Hamilton was called the Pittsburgh of Canada, and while there is still steelmaking there, the manufacturing sector’s strength has also been the driving force behind continued growth in imports of finished steel. At 620,000 tonnes, steel shipments in 2017 were their highest level in a decade, 20 percent higher than in 2016. There is strong demand for finished steel from regional manufacturers, including automotive, and the construction sector. “It was a solid year for investment at the port,” said Hamilton. There were “new private sector facilities coming into operation. Investments included G3 Canada


www.heavyliftpfi.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166