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COUNTRY REPORTCANADA


Thunder Bay has become a primary gateway to


Western Canada for oil and gas, steel, various high or heavy project cargo, and renewable energy cargoes, especially wind.


has seen an increase in renewable energy projects, whereas developments in Quebec and Ontario have subsided. “Thunder Bay has become a primary gateway to Western Canada for oil and gas, steel, various high or heavy project cargo, and renewable energy cargoes, especially wind. That growth is due to its close proximity and good road and rail clearances and connections to Western Canada.”


That said, he added: “Road, rail, and bridge upgrades are needed in many areas as cargo size increases, especially for wind turbines. Legislative barriers and inconsistent permitting through various provincial and municipal jurisdictions complicate movement. There are very few suitable dedicated road corridors for heavy cargo. The small market size sometimes limits the availability of specialised carriers and equipment when multiple projects occur in a short period. Obviously unpredictable winter weather conditions can impact vessel, rail and truck transport schedules.”


Logistec is expecting a little more activity in wind power projects, as well as some increase in oil and gas – namely pipelines and pre-fabricated modules for drilling and production. The company also expects to see


a shift to shortsea shipping and inland rail transport due to tight truck capacity and driver shortages.


Logistec has operations along the Great Lakes in Ontario and Quebec, as well as Atlantic Canada and the US Northeast. Its recent acquisition of Gulf Stream Marine, a major player in the breakbulk and heavy lift sectors in the US Gulf, represents a major expansion of Logistec’s terminal network in the USA.


Atlantic Canada There is a lot going on in Atlantic Canada, said Nancy Phillips, vice president of investment, trade and international partnerships at the Halifax Partnership. Total value for all the projects is more than CAD1 billion (USD780 million). “This region is the most active in the


Americas for in-stream tidal projects.” She noted a project by Tidal Energy in the Bay of Fundy. The share of Nova Scotia’s energy supply that comes from renewable sources continues to rise. “Our renewable share as of 2017 is at 29 percent,” said Phillips, citing statistics from the provincial utility, “and apparently we are on track to hit the legislated requirement of 40 percent in 2020.


www.heavyliftpfi.com


May/June 2018


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