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COUNTRY REPORTSPAIN


The port of Tarragona is working hard to support an increasing volume of project cargo.


improving our facilities and developing more, and better, services. At present, as a result of these improvements, we have new clients which results in a higher level of occupancy of the site. In fact, we are currently coordinating the construction and implementation of various important projects,” she said.


Port records


According to Puertos del Estado, Spanish ports had a record-breaking year in 2017, with a total of 545 million tonnes of cargo moved – up nearly 7 percent year-on-year over 2016. Imports grew 8.1 percent to 202.3 million tonnes, and exports by 7.4 percent to 967 million tonnes. Puertos del Estado said that Spanish ports are a good option for transit cargoes with almost 137 million tonnes moved in 2017 (up 12 percent year-on-year). “Likewise, ro-ro traffic has increased


6.8 percent, amounting to more than 57 million tonnes. This type of traffic involves a wide range of logistics activities that positively impact intermodality and generate employment associated with port traffic.” Preliminary statistics for the first two months of 2018 indicate that this year has


fracking, a high level of bureaucracy and the high costs of the extraction methods necessary to cope with Spain’s geology, can be overcome. Plus, the country acts as a refining and distribution hub, sourcing gas from various locations and thus potentially able to contribute to Europe’s energy security.


Spain also has a number of renewable energy targets that form its own national strategy, under the EU’s Renewable Energy Directive. According to the European Commission, by 2020 the country is aiming to generate 22.7 percent of its gross energy consumption from renewable sources.


Forecasts


Government investment increased slightly over the course of 2017 and into the start of 2018; there certainly seems to be a trend for government spending to grow gradually as the Spanish economy picks up. Bringas noted that there is


also private investment, as much www.heavyliftpfi.com


by Spanish companies as foreign ones. “Although this investment is also tentative, we are recovering little by little,” he believes.


Indeed, that increasing investment is resulting in a rise in project cargo volumes moving through Spain’s ports, which are themselves investing to keep up with demand and to retain or grow market share. For instance, Genoveva Climent Dewit, commercial director at the port of Tarragona in Catalonia, said project cargo traffic there is stable. “Principal destinations for [project] cargo handled at our facilities include the Middle East, Northern Europe, North Africa and South America,” she added.


Dewit explained that Spanish port authorities are subject to the government body Puertos del Estado, which defines the objectives that each respective port must work towards. “As such, the port of


Tarragona, under Puertos del Estado, invests each year in order to be more competitive,


Breakbulk & Project Cargo Logistics via


Bilbao PORT OF


Cluster for the competitiveness and promotion of the PORT OF BILBAO and its companies


Alda. Urquijo, 9 - 1º D. 48008 Bilbao - SPAIN T +34 94 423 6782 I info@uniportbilbao.es I www.uniportbilbao.eus


May/June 2018


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