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COUNTRY REPORTSPAIN


Spain has increased its overseas exports of capital goods in the last few years but, according to Juan Madsen, ceo at Madrid- headquartered transport engineering company Coordinadora Internacional de Cargas, much more remains to be done before the country can truly be said to have entered a positive economic cycle. “One positive aspect of the great crisis that we have suffered is that in Spain all businesses, whatever their area of activity – from lawyers to manufacturers of turbines, boilers and so on – have had to learn to go out into external markets, which has led to the creation of new commercial routes and the development of existing ones, mainly with the Americas and the Middle East,” Madsen pointed out. Project cargo exported from Spain largely comprises shipments relating to wind power, solar power, general machinery, thermoelectric plants and so on, said Jimmy Jaber Bringas, managing director at Sparber


“In addition, other [markets] have been developing over the last few years and are becoming more and more important, such as routes to North Africa and the entire Middle East region – the latter being one of the principal destinations where business and projects are helping Spanish companies to grow.”


The main imports into Spain, said Madsen, are solar panels from China and wind turbines, although the capacity of the country to manufacture equipment for the wind energy sector is very high.


One positive aspect of the great crisis that we have suffered is that in Spain all businesses, whatever their area of activity, have had to learn to go out into external markets...


Coordinadora Internacional de Cargas


Transport in Bilbao. Destinations include Africa, South America and the USA. Madsen added: “The traditional routes remain as strong as they have ever been, those between Spain and the USA being among the most important, historically speaking.


– Juan Madsen, Ups and downs


As is the case in many parts of the world, renewable energy industries are performing well. The solar power sector has been busy, although that tends to involve container traffic rather than project cargo shipments; wind energy has been on the uptick in the Americas – a key market for Spain. Among the renewable energy projects within Spain that have received approval is Cepsa’s first ever wind farm, a 29 MW project located in Jerez de la Frontera, Cádiz, which will comprise 11 Siemens Gamesa turbines. The facility is scheduled to come online in late 2018.


Nordex, meanwhile, will upgrade Acciona


Energía’s 30 MW El Cabrito wind farm (one of its oldest sites), replacing 90 old turbines with 12 new ones that have a far higher capacity as well as being cheaper to operate.


Coordinadora moved a 50.6 m


fractionator from South Korea to Peru for the Talara refinery modernisation project.


www.heavyliftpfi.com


May/June 2018


67


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