search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
CAPITAL PROJECTS & CONTRACTSOVERVIEW Commodities outlook improves


Commodity prices are rising and new projects are being approved around the world as energy majors, having driven down costs, begin to invest some of their cash stockpiles, writes David Kershaw.


C


ommodity prices strengthened in the first quarter of 2018,


supported by both demand growth and restricted supply. The outlook painted by the


World Bank’s latest Commodity Markets Outlook sees oil prices rising by 22 percent, from an average of USD53 in 2017 to USD65 per barrel in 2018 through to 2019. Global demand and continued production restraint by OPEC and non-OPEC producers should serve to prop up prices. Higher oil prices are expected to eventually feed into higher natural gas prices, which the World Bank expects to increase by 8 percent in 2018. Coal prices will continue to decline to an average USD85 per tonne in 2018, as energy demand shifts towards cleaner energy sources.


Rising oil prices and limited


supply are telltale indicators that the energy majors will reach into their pockets and start investing in new exploration and production (E&P) activities. Offshore suppliers have been busy in recent years streamlining operations and reducing their cost base. The current tailwind in the oil market is likely to propel 100 new offshore projects to be sanctioned in 2018, with a value of approximately USD100 billion, according to Rystad Energy. This compares with only 60 projects in 2017 and below 40 in 2016. “The offshore suppliers have


www.heavyliftpfi.com


more news at www.heavyliftpfi.com


created their own comeback,” said Audun Martinsen, vice president of oilfield service research at Rystad Energy. “Their constant search for cost reductions and streamlining of operations has enabled them to cut offshore project costs by almost 50 percent compared with the heights of the last cycle.”


Shortening lead times “Not only are the suppliers charging less for their services, they have also improved the efficiencies of their operations, thus shortening lead times from project sanctioning to first oil. As an example, the time required to drill and complete a well has fallen by 30 percent in the North Sea, the Gulf of Mexico and Brazil over the past four years,” Martinsen added.


Rystad forecasts that about


30 project approvals would come through in Asia this year, including Pegaga in Malaysia and D6 in India. Some 30 projects could come online in Europe, including Neptune Deep in Romania and the already sanctioned Penguins redevelopment in the UK. Africa should approve nearly


20 projects, including Zinia 2. A similar number is predicted in the Americas, where major schemes like Vito and Mero 2 are maturing.


“E&P companies have more


free cashflow at hand in 2018 than they did during the recent peak years of 2008 and 2011. In fact, 60 percent of the companies looking to finance their project development costs can do so through their cash flow. Supported by strong oil


E&P companies have more free cashflow at hand in 2018 than they did during the recent peak years of 2008 and 2011. – Audun Martinsen, Rystad Energy


prices, we see a very small risk of these projects not


materialising,” Martinsen said. However, Wood Mackenzie’s second annual State of the Upstream Industry survey, published in April, states that financial health rather than growth remains the priority for upstream oil and gas companies, with low-risk growth still preferred by the sector.


Mergers and acquisitions Wood Mackenzie did suggest that asset mergers and acquisitions (M&A), as well as frontier exploration, are more attractive options this year than in 2017.


Martin Kelly, Wood


Mackenzie’s head of corporate analysis, said: “The industry’s growing confidence is evident in spending expectations, too. More will be spent globally and in each region this year compared with last year. Capital investment, exploration investment and M&A spending will all increase by at least 10 percent year-on-year.”


May/June 2018


HLPFI 61


BP


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166