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FROM OUR CORRESPONDENTAFRICA


The renewable energy sector is growing faster in developing countries than in developed nations.


were given no reasons for the delays by South Africa’s newly appointed energy minister, Jeff Radebe. Radebe, reluctant to comment on decisions made by his predecessor, chose instead to focus on “current and future developments”.


While asserting that regulatory and


policy certainty was “now in place” he did admit that the delays and government backtracking had damaged investor confidence, a situation that will hopefully be remedied by these latest developments. One of the reasons cited by industry for the delays in implementing the power projects has been the objections from the National Union of Mineworkers of South Africa (NUMSA). It claimed the


OUR JOB IS LOGISTICS WITH PASSION AND COMMITMENT QUALITY AND TRUST


EXPERTS IN AFRICAN LOGISTICS - PROJECTS AND 4PL INDUSTRY


POLYTRA AFRICA


Long-standing expertise & experience in African logistics


POLYTRA 4PL INDUSTRY


Worldwide supply chain solutions with enhanced transparency and control


POLYTRA PROJECTS


Tailor-made logistics for turnkey project cargo


renewable energy programme would lead to job losses as a result of the closure of mines and an estimated four coal-fired power stations. The government has responded by pointing out that any job losses would most likely be the result of mines and power stations reaching the end of their economic lives, and that any possible job losses should be viewed in light of the job creation


OFFICES IN ANTWERP - HAMBURG - BARCELONA - KINSHASA - MATADI - LUBUMBASHI - KOLWEZI - NDOLA - DAR ES SALAAM - KIGOMA - DURBAN


www.polytra.be SINCE 1974 - FAMILY OWNED


prospects of the renewable projects. The 27 renewable projects that have now been given the go-ahead are expected to create 61,600 full-time jobs, mostly during the construction period. The projects are spread out in all nine of South Africa’s provinces.


Mozambique solar project Scatec Solar, KLP Norfund Investments and Electricidade de Mozambique (EDM) have closed debt financing and initiated construction of a 40 MW solar plant close to the city of Mocuba in Mozambique. This is the first large scale solar plant to be built in the country and represents an important step in realizing Mozambique’s ambition to increase renewable power generation in its energy mix.


The overall, long-term positive growth prospects of Africa’s renewable energy sector has also been highlighted in a recent Bloomberg study. It showed that growth in renewable energy investment in developing countries has overtaken that of developed countries.


Clarity on renewable energy policies in


South Africa, coupled with increased investment in new power projects across the region, will be welcome news for those involved in handling heavy and oversize cargoes, as well as to the 650 million people across the continent that are currently living in ‘energy poverty’.


HLPFI


Scatec Solar is expected to begin constructing a 40 MW solar photovoltaic project in Mozambique in the second quarter of 2018.


58 May/June 2018 www.heavyliftpfi.com


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