search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
REGIONAL REPORTMEXICO & CENTRAL AMERICA


Costa Rica’s pockets of activity


Central America remains in the doldrums overall when it comes to public projects, according to Adam Crabbe (pictured), president of Costa Rica-based logistics company Laninco.


Costa Rica, for instance, is not as competitive as it needs to be and business leaders have pointed to the need to improve its productivity – which is partly blamed on the high cost of energy. But there are pockets of activity in the country. For instance: “Costa Rica state utility Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad (ICE) has built impressive dams and geothermal power plants. Drilling for the [second phase of the] 55 MW geothermal plant at Las Pailas has just been completed, so we hope construction will start there soon.” Renewable energy is a big deal in many Central American countries, with wind power particularly popular. Indeed, Crabbe said: “Costa Rica is a potential exporter of energy, like other Central American and South American countries – geothermal, wind, solar, it is all there.” In terms of construction projects, Costa Rica’s government has put forward plans for the first phase of an airport in Orotina, which could come online in 2027.


Meanwhile, he said that Costa Rica’s Port Moin project, under development by APM, continues


Costa Rica; people only really think of tourism but there is so much to do here,” Crabbe said. “There is work here for 200 years to bring Latin America up to 21st century standards – in terms of general infrastructure, schools, hospitals, bridges, dams and roads.”


A major cause for caution for investors and businesses was the national election in February, which failed to give a clear result. Concern over the high cost of energy and the growing fiscal deficit are not being sufficiently addressed according to many, and all of this is against a backdrop of some significant corruption scandals. However, Crabbe confirmed: “The second round on April 1 saw a significant majority of voters (60 percent, approximately) prefer Carlos Alvarado of the Centre Left Citizens Action Party (PAC) as president.


apace. A new convention centre officially opened in April this year. Port Moin is about a year overdue, and should open in the first quarter of 2019. It will cater for post-Panamax vessels with 13,000 teu capacity. There have been delays, but dredging has started and Crabbe said APM Terminals seemed quite happy with the progress. “It is hoped that it will make a difference to project cargo but that remains to be seen,” he added cautiously.


As for the convention centre, the hope there is that it will improve the standing of the country both within the region and internationally. “We need to try to draw more business into


“It is hoped that he and his administration will be able to address the business concerns as well as the social, which will mean more investment in projects. One of Alvarado’s most important points in his campaign was the backing for the electric train project.”


This development in the Greater Metropolitan Area would involve 80 km of track, at a cost of around USD1.6 billion. Laninco, a heavy lift and project cargo specialist, recently merged with its local partner, AIMI Consolidations. “The margins in logistics since the crisis have been razor thin, and the merger will enable us to reinforce our services and offer more across the region and internationally,” Crabbe affirmed.


Servygru is currently doing well out of the mining industry, as well as power generation.


implementing measures such as support for female employees to achieve the balance of work and family that they want. “You have to adapt and change your culture in order to keep your talent,” de los Santos said. The big news for Tradelossa right now, though, is its recent purchase of a Goldhofer Faktor 5 high girder bridge.


“This is top technology; Goldhofer has www.heavyliftpfi.com


only made nine of them and we took delivery of the ninth one in March,” de los Santos confirmed. “We already have one Goldhofer girder bridge, which is an older model. The new one will massively improve our capabilities; it will allow us to have parallel bridges and double our capacity to move super-heavy loads.”


HLPFI May/June 2018 45


There is increasing competition from project forwarders based elsewhere entering the Mexican market.


– Deyanira López Colunga, Servygru


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166