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REGIONAL REPORTSOUTHEAST ASIA


decision (FID) forecast with 19 fields, including Senoro Phase 2 and Bukit, which are both later phases of earlier developments.


In Malaysia, the analyst highlighted Mubadala Petroleum’s Pegaga gasfield as potentially the biggest FID in the region this year. The deal was closed in March, with Mubadala announcing the project would now move to the construction and installation stage.


According to Dennis Tan, executive director of Port Klang-based forwarder Tera Projects & Shipping, the expansion of Vopak’s liquid storage terminal in Pengerang will “keep the project industry moving for at least the next two years”. The facility will be expanded to 1.7 million cu m capacity and will serve the huge Petronas RAPID refinery and petrochemical complex. Away from oil and gas, Tan said Chinese BRI-linked investment in Malaysia – totalling some USD150 billion – is fuelling multiple transport and energy infrastructure projects. These include the USD13 billion East Coast Rail Link connecting Malaysia’s east and west coasts, the Kuala Lumpur- Singapore high-speed rail project, and power plants at Jimah, Sinohydro Bintulu and Port Klang. “Palm oil refinery equipment is still growing well and Indonesia remains a strong market for Malaysian fabricators,” added Tan. “Cargoes moving into Malaysia include steel structures meant for construction purposes, heavy equipment such as new cranes, excavators and bulldozers, and oil and gas plant.


“There are also plenty of concrete structures to be delivered for the construction of the new Light Rail Transit (LTR) project in Sarawak, and soon for the Pan Borneo highway project as well.”


Changing regulations Tan said new regulations in Malaysia are both helping and hindering project logistics operations. For example, the Immigration & Checkpoints Authority of Singapore restricted the movement of oversized cargoes crossing the Malaysia border, which has added logistics costs since some modules must now be barged. On the other hand, the Malaysian government has introduced a new ‘Pioneer Status’ tax incentive for transportation companies, which is designed to encourage local players to “upgrade their businesses”. Tera was recently contracted for the decommissioning of the Petronas PVC plant in Kerteh, a city on Malaysia’s east coast. “The project took us about nine months


144 May/June 2018


to plan and execute and it was a huge challenge for us in terms of cost, safety and time. We shipped close to 16,000 freight tons in two voyages, with the heaviest piece coming close to 120 tonnes in weight and cargoes measuring up to 8 m in diameter. “Due to road restrictions and height, we had to create a jungle pathway by trimming the trees, laying aggregates and sand, and placing steel plate reinforcements to allow our cargoes to roll through the area without any hiccups.


“In addition, due to the time factor and restrictions on the total road blockage for the oversize move, we had to remove the signage and traffic lights, and close the road to escort six units in one go, which required a lot of manpower and coordination.” Another project logistics specialist regularly overcoming Southeast Asia’s


infrastructure challenges is Manila-based All Transport Network (ATN). Penny Estrada, director overseas business development, said equipment is often scarce; a lack of port connectivity also contributes to high freight costs.


“Sometimes there are even physical limitations to receiving multiple containers, so deliveries require permits which can be bureaucratic and time consuming. “In many instances, projects do not push through at the bidding stage because the accurate costs are too steep, or the supplier’s quotes were very low or inaccurate so expectations were not managed once shipments begin.”


Philippines expansion The Philippines’ economy is currently growing consistently at around 7 percent a year, making it one of the fastest expanding markets in the ASEAN region. “President Duterte has an ambitious and


self-explanatory project called ‘Build, Build, Build’,” remarked Estrada.


“Initially it comprised 75 projects for the expansion and building of ports, airports and roads; energy providers – renewable, LNG, solar and wind – are also being challenged to provide sustainable solutions, especially in off-grid and remote areas in smaller islands and mountainous regions.


“I am seeing the same trend in our


At times, our transport engineers have to assist in designing temporary jetties for barges in order to come as close as possible to the site location to limit travelling on bumpy roads – Lars Skov Christensen, BWS


neighbouring countries, especially supporting infrastructure for China’s BRI project,” said Estrada. “Since the Philippines is an archipelago without bordering countries, the country is independent from said projects – although we have been seeing an influx of foreign investment from China. “Overall it is a very exciting time for logistics – especially for project cargo – in the Philippines and Southeast Asia.”


HLPFI www.heavyliftpfi.com


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