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OPERATIONAL REVIEWSTRAPPING & LASHING


humble opinion, this is unbelievable. If the Master inspects it and adds another 20 chains, one still cannot say whether it is safe or not, simply because no one calculated it.


Who pays? If the cargo is lashed according to plan, no additional costs are due. If surveyors request additional lashing and securing (and they can prove that their calculations are correct), it should be discussed. If correct, this could mean that none of the people who started this project knew what they were doing, or additional information came to light. Honestly speaking, many companies


know exactly what they are doing. Insurance companies have capable people who can verify calculations. The additional expenses would get back to the cargo owners/ insurance/freight forwarders, depending on their agreement with each other. However, if a party requests more lashing


and securing and cannot provide calculations, why should anybody else pay for it? However, I would never agree blindly to add more and more, regardless of who is paying for it. More chains do not automatically mean more safety.


In-house knowledge We are often requested to act as an expert witness in court. Details and knowledge are specific to each case. Therefore, I always tell myself: “If my case were in court, you must be able to defend yourself.” At least for the technical part that you have been assigned to complete. Now, let us say there are three options:


If the cargo is lashed according to plan, no additional costs are due.


1. An experienced surveyor in the heavy lift and project cargo business,


2. An experienced surveyor, but not in the heavy lift and project cargo business,


3. An inexperienced surveyor in the heavy- lift and project cargo business.


Option 1: He can easily defend himself in court, prove and substantiate the calculations he made. He will have a good night’s sleep afterwards. Option 2: If something goes wrong and questions arise, this surveyor cannot really substantiate his actions. He will seek help and they will try to build a case to defend his actions. In today’s world, many pictures/videos are


Heavy weather lashing lessons


Captain David Nichol of the UK P&I Club described a recent case of insufficient cargo securing onboard a ro-ro vessel. In this case, a ship loaded with trucks, wheeled and tracked excavators, containers and other general cargo, fell foul of weather conditions. The ship’s crew carried out cargo securing


operations. Chain lashings attached to the fixed strong points on both the interior main deck cargo space and upper external weather deck were the primary method used to secure the cargoes. During the voyage, heavy weather and wind


speeds of up to BF 9 were encountered, causing the vessel to roll and pitch heavily despite the Master’s efforts to alleviate the motion by altering course and speed. During a particularly heavy roll, the officer on watch (OOW) observed a single two-tier stack of 40 ft containers on the weather deck to shift, which then impacted adjacent cargo. This set in motion a


138 May/June 2018


‘domino effect’ whereby cargo units progressively broke free and shifted, resulting in extensive damage to ship structure and cargo, with a number of units being lost overboard. “A cargo-shifting incident of this nature has the


potential to endanger both the crew and the seaworthiness on the vessel,” said Nichol. Although there was some criticism of the stowage arrangement with respect to the absence of suitable dunnage between the heavy excavator tracks and the weather-deck plating, a serious deficiency in the manner the two containers were stuffed was likely to have played a role in initiating the incident. “Both containers were loaded with machinery


parts, none of which were properly secured within. Critically, a very heavy cast steel ballast weight was placed within the upper container, the free movement of which caused the stack to become


taken; I feel that you can never have enough material. Option 3: If something goes wrong and this surveyor has to go to court, what will happen? They will blame him and he has very little chance of defending himself. However, in the end, someone appointed him to do a good job, probably on a budget. Is there any reason to invest in people or


in yourself to gain particular knowledge? I think there are enough grounds to do so. HLPFI


Author: Will van ’t Heck, Videck. The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide to the subject matter. Specialist advice should be sought about your specific circumstances.


unstable and impart severe racking forces on the lower container, resulting in the failure of the corner castings, twist-locks and lashings,” Nichol explained. This case presented a number of notable lessons


that should be learned from. “The safe carriage of containers and other general cargo is very reliant upon the shipper’s accurate declaration of weight, contents and the proper stowage of materials within the cargo unit,” said Nichol. Very dense, heavy cargo items should not be


carried in standard containers unless stowed on cradles that allow the cargo to be properly secured and spread the load. “The stowage of heavy containers on top of lighter containers should be avoided.” He added that cargo stowage and securing should


be performed with reference to the Cargo Securing Manual, “having in mind sound principles of good seamanship and based on the most severe weather conditions expected for the intended voyage.”


www.heavyliftpfi.com


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