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OPERATIONAL REVIEWSTRAPPING & LASHING


requested additional securing, was not involved in this initial design phase. Costs inevitably begin to creep up. For an insurance company, the more lashing the better. This same logic often applies to all the non-paying parties. However, extra securing means less profit for the shipping line if it has to cover the additional costs.


One of the solutions would be an agreed safety percentage (ASP). Calculate to 100 percent safety and add an additional 10-15 percent, depending on what is agreed among the parties.


Lashing and securing calculations already have a margin of safety built in. By taking the accelerations from CSS Annex 13, a safety factor from Break Load (BL) to Maximum Securing Load (MSL) of 50 percent (chains) and an additional safety factor of 1.35 (or 1.5) for the capacity of each chain (20 tonnes BL – becomes 10 tonnes MSL – becomes 7.41 tonnes for each chain).


Safety margins


So again, is 100 percent safe? In my opinion it is. One could request an additional 10-15 percent safety margin by increasing the amount of chains or stoppers. All relevant parties should agree to a safety margin ahead of the project move – including the cargo owners, shipping lines, insurance companies and, if applicable, a marine warranty surveyor.


If all parties agree on a 10-15 percent margin of safety as being sufficient for the


136 May/June 2018


A rule of thumb sometimes heard in the industry is that 20 chains are sufficient to secure a cargo. In my humble opinion this is unbelievable. –Will van ’t Hek ,Videck


project, the original lashing and securing quotes from the shipping line will be accurate.


A cargo should be considered over-lashed if the agreed safety percentage is exceeded. Is this a problem? No, but it depends on how much you exceed it by. If you want one or two additional chains, no one will argue about this. But sometimes, someone requests so much additional lashing that it could be considered extreme.


Also, the phrase ‘Master decides...’ is heard frequently. The Master has the final word on lashing and securing before setting out to sea. However, if a proper lashing and securing plan was prepared, all calculations were presented and followed, why should this be in doubt?


A Master can argue that bad weather is forecast. However, all potential acceleration forces should already have been calculated in the original stowage calculations. The potential acceleration forces are always higher than the real values. The Master can always add chains if he wants, although these expenses are never relayed to anyone else but the shipping line.


I believe that calculations are the basis of any safe stowage plan. A rule of thumb sometimes heard in the industry is that 20 chains are sufficient to secure a cargo. In my


NEWS IN BRIEF Van Beest merges


brands into Green Pin Netherlands-based Van Beest, which manufactures Tycan fibre chain, Excel chain fittings and Green Pin rope fittings, is merging its Tycan and Excel brands into Green Pin. Excel will cease to exist as a separate brand


and Tycan will be used under the Green Pin umbrella as the name for all products related to fibre technology. Van Beest will continue to sell the full product


range – Tycan fibre chain, Green Pin rope fittings and Green Pin chain fittings – under the new brand name through its existing distributor network.


Bishop Lifting takes


Safeway Sling Bishop Lifting Products has acquired Safeway Sling USA, a sling fabrication company headquartered in Greendale, Wisconsin, USA.


www.heavyliftpfi.com


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