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INDUSTRY REVIEWNON-RENEWABLE POWER GENERATION


IEA notes energy demand across the ten ASEAN countries grew by 60 percent over the past 15 years, and will grow by a further two-thirds by 2040. Coal is expected to account for 40 percent of the growth, with demand for natural gas rising 60 percent. One major project already under way is Thailand- based TTCL’s USD2.8 billion, 1,280 MW coal-fired plant in Kayin state, Myanmar. It is a different story for developed economies such as the UK, where coal-fired plants are being shut down.


Krishnan said overhauling the plants with new technologies to limit their carbon footprint is not commercially viable. As in Europe, longstanding fossil fuel powered plants are being replaced by renewable energy sources.


There are, however, new nuclear facilities in the pipeline. “We continue to closely follow the progress of the nuclear opportunities in the UK, with both Wylfa and Hinkley both progressing at a very early stage,” said DHL’s Hagleitner. “With our strong track record in successful execution of new nuclear projects in China, we are well positioned to transfer this knowledge to our UK team for these longer-term opportunities.”


Nuclear construction Globally, there are around 50 nuclear reactors under construction, the majority of which are in Asia, according to the World Nuclear Association. Significant capacity is slated for Russia, which has 25 reactors under construction, as well as in China and India. In the UAE, the world’s largest single nuclear project is due to come online this year. The Barakah plant, the UAE’s first nuclear facility, will have a 5.6 GW capacity.


“There are quite a few new nuclear power plants in the pipeline, including in Bangladesh, India, Turkey and the UK, to name a few,” noted Philippe Somers, Geodis’ senior vice president industrial projects.


“But, the permit approval process is always extremely long. Hence, nothing to be moved any time soon. There is of course the constant repair and refurbishment of the existing plant that create some opportunities, such as in France and the USA.” Somers said Geodis is currently handling non-renewable projects in Bolivia and Thailand, and that it has “quite a few spot shipments of transformers from the major manufacturers in Europe and China to worldwide”.


The power generation sector has and will continue to be a saviour for many heavy lift carriers and project forwarders, making up


130 May/June 2018


for the lack of oil and gas and mining-related cargoes, added Somers.


Like his counterparts, he emphasised the expanding role of renewables. “The renewable power industry has been very busy. We handled a lot of wind projects, but solar has increased equally and some say it


Power generation has and will continue to be a saviour for many heavy lift carriers and project forwarders, compensating for the lack of oil and gas and mining-related cargoes. – Philippe Somers, Geodis


will overtake the wind projects.” For DHL, oil projects and coal-to- biomass conversions have provided some non-renewable power project opportunities. “We are seeing growth in oil-related projects, with renewed activity across sub-Saharan Africa and the US Gulf,” said Hagleitner. “Our UK team of specialists has already been involved in the movement of project cargo to some facilities undergoing conversion from coal-to-biomass; this will continue in the market but this is not a major area of growth for the industry as a whole. “Besides large-scale projects, we are also focusing on big ad hoc moves for power companies, with a dedicated centralised team taking care of those quotations. This helps us to counteract the cyclical project business quite nicely, and is often the stepping stone for project contracts,” she added. Meanwhile, one interesting trend observed by deugro’s Krishnan is the major developing economies taking greater control over the investment and delivery of their respective power sectors. “For example, in Brazil, in order to obtain financing, domestic national development banks impose limitations on the number of overseas imports for a project. This in turn led to the domestic fabrication and sourcing markets flourishing.”


Two industrial gas turbines,


manufactured by Siemens, are pictured being shipped from Sweden to the Termoeléctrica del Sur power plant in Bolivia.


HLPFI www.heavyliftpfi.com


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