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INDUSTRY REVIEWNON-RENEWABLE POWER GENERATION


deugro recently completed a major gas-fired plant project in Turkey for Samsung C&T, which saw the company move 65,000 freight tons of equipment, including multiple super-heavy loads.


800 MW coal-fired power units. Unlike India, China has been successful in achieving full electrification for its 1.4 billion people. The process saw China become the world’s largest carbon emitter, energy producer, consumer and importer of coal, according to a report by non-profit research company Chinadialogue. Nevertheless, following the 2015 Paris climate change agreement and concerns over the effects of pollution on public health, China has committed to balancing its energy needs and emissions output with a cleaner power mix. According to the National Bureau of Statistics, while over 60 percent of China’s total installed capacity is generated by non-renewables – coal, oil and gas – renewable capacity is growing the fastest with wind energy up 10 percent to 163.67GW and solar surging 67 percent year-on-year to 125.79 GW.


China’s Belt & Road Initiative (BRI) is often discussed through the lens of trade and transport. However, energy infrastructure is also a crucial pillar of China’s New Silk Road ambitions. Interestingly, as renewable energy production is ramped up at home, China is funding numerous coal-fired power plants across the so-called BRI countries.


Pakistan projects In Pakistan, for example, a country with huge coal reserves, key projects within the controversial BRI-driven USD54 billion


www.heavyliftpfi.com


For DHL, oil projects and coal-to- biomass conversions have provided some non-renewable opportunities. We are seeing growth in oil-related projects, with renewed activity across sub-Saharan Africa and the US Gulf.


– Nikola Hagleitner, DHL


China Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) include a dozen coal power plants. The plants will supply three-quarters of the 16 GW of electricity Pakistan hopes to generate to alleviate its power shortfall – the country lacks electricity for around 30 percent of its 190 million population. China is funding 240 coal power projects across 25 BRI countries, Chinadialogue notes, including in Africa, where over 600million live without electricity. According to IEA, over 100 coal plants are currently under development across the African continent. China has been and continues to be a source of funding and a major supplier to these projects, and has been accused of pushing “dirty” coal projects abroad while turning to cleaner energy at home. Demand for electricity in Africa is expected to triple by 2040. Related to China’s energy policies are the winds of political change blowing across North America. US President Donald Trump indicated early in his presidency his desire to aid the country’s traditional fossil fuel-based energy industry and moved quickly to withdraw from the Paris Agreement. Trump’s 2019 budget, released in February, backed nuclear and coal while cutting funding for renewables. However, despite his vocal support for the coal industry, production looks set to continue on a downward trend due to cheap shale gas. Furthermore, Trump’s latest move –


May/June 2018 127


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