search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
REGIONAL REPORTTHE BALKANS


“Our cargoes are based on export projects for Croatian clients – delivering and handling transformers up weighing up to 150 tonnes, transportation of machinery and other oversized cargoes around Europe. Also we have a lot of projects through Rijeka port. “One of our biggest projects in 2017 was the delivery of 27, 105-tonne transformers at the port for Siemens. The final ten had to be delivered and unloaded in ten days, which was very challenging – but we made it. Also, there were some transformer deliveries for Koncar D&ST, to north Sweden, during difficult winter conditions.” Bergovac also highlighted the issue of permits in the region.“There are major problems for all Balkans countries with very expensive permits, except Slovenia,” he explained. “Because of that, most of the oversized transports bypass Croatia by going through Hungary. Also, we need an escort for each oversized transport, which makes no sense. For example, we have cargo 2.6 m wide and we need to escort it on the whole route, even on the highway.” He added that a lack of permanent permits in Croatia causes uneccesary delays. “Permits are valid only for few hours and every day our trucks are waiting for a few hours because of that.”


Mission Impossible


Bergovac said that in Croatia there are 14 offices for permits (one for each region) and each works in its own way. “Most of the office employees do not know a lot about oversized transport and it is very difficult to work with them. Also their behaviour is sometimes arrogant, instead of being at our service. They do not care when our trucks and drivers are waiting for their signatures and approval on permits.” To change this is ‘Mission Impossible’ because the state stands behind the system, said Bergovac. Politicians are keen to keep a lot of people employed in bureaucratic structures in order to avoid strikes and losing their positions, he claimed; Bergovac also fears the economy could collapse in the next few years as a result. “This situation is unsustainable. In Croatia there are about 4 million citizens, and only 1 million of them are working in the private sector.” He went further, pointing to poor quality/inexperienced companies undercutting prices in order to win contracts.


“There are a few companies that crush transport prices and most of them are connected with some official who is making permits for oversized transport,” said Bergovac. The high cost of permits and the


112 May/June 2018


Zagrebtrans has completed its first wind farm projects in Montenegro and Bosnia & Herzegovina, and will be executing the first ever wind turbine project in Kosovo this year.


influence of state officials create room for illegal activities, he added. Roosen at R&B Global Projects is philosophical. “Bureaucracy rules, certainly – but it is not all bad. Challenging, yes, but with the correct and patient approach it [moving oversize/weight] is perfectly possible. The ports are accessible, no major restrictions in the main ports, cranes are OK up to 100 tonnes or slightly above, or even much heavier shipyard cranes can be used where needed. Even getting permits for heavy/oversized road movements is quite achievable and they can be obtained within a maximum of three weeks usually. “Of course, the region is what it is – loads of tunnels, bridges, islands and mountainous areas to be passed, but that keeps the charm and the challenge in the job we do. The unfortunate thing is that Croatia is not really served by any breakbulk shipping lines on a steady and regular basis – of course the usual carriers come in/out at irregular intervals depending on cargo flow, but the regularity is missing really. On the other hand, would Croatia be able to generate enough cargo once a regular service started? I am afraid not.” The issue of differences in local regulations between the Balkan countries is old and will not be resolved soon. Holleman’s Ganchev said transport problems are low down on government agendas.


There are major problems for all Balkans countries with very expensive permits, except Slovenia. – Ivica Bergovac, Velebit Promet


“We are trying to change the rules and insist on having annual permits, for example, but for some years this has been a fight with wind turbine transport. The authorities are not interested or afraid of making changes, even if we prove that it will be of bigger benefit for all of us, including the state budget.”


Costs of bureaucracy


Another issue is that the authorities like to collect money from oversized and heavy transporters as if they are easy moneymakers, he added.


In Bulgaria and Romania, Hollemann must prepare and submit transportation plans every time it handles cargo over certain dimensions, which often costs more than EUR1,000 (USD1,237).


“This is sometimes more than the costs for the permit itself – and we have to pay these costs again and again even if we pass with the same combination on the same route one or two days after that. Nobody can convince me that the checking is done again and again, but this is the way to collect money,” said Ganchev.


Meanwhile, the problem with the grey economy keeps on growing, he said. “On one side we have good companies with modern equipment. On the other, we have small truckers with old equipment that are trying to take a piece of the cake at any cost.” Ganchev suggested that smaller, less- reputable companies often save on costs by not taking the required permits, necessary escorts or bridge inspections.


“There are no clear signs of the state’s will to fight this. My feeling is that this is also the same in neighbouring countries.”


HLPFI www.heavyliftpfi.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166