search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
INDUSTRY FOCUSRAILFREIGHT


Wind energy boost for North American carriers


The rapid growth of wind energy generation, partly driven by the US and Canadian governments’ targets on renewable energy, has created opportunities for CN Rail and other carriers in the North American railway industry.


Iris Thornton, senior manager specialized


services, CN Supply Chain Solutions, said that rail is the natural mode of transport for wind turbine components, including blades, nacelles and tower sections. “It makes a lot of sense. Rail is ideally suited for transporting large volumes of outsize and heavy items over long distances.”


Moving the pieces by road would also involve width, height and weight restrictions, particularly through urban areas, but additionally includes the need for a much wider range of permits than rail requires. In Canada, rail does not have to deal with the extra weight restrictions that loads on the road face during the spring thaw.


Initially the wind power units were sourced from Europe, but are now produced more in Asia and in North America itself. The CN rail network extends across Canada to both the east and west coasts, major ports in the Great Lakes as well as down through the USA to the Gulf of Mexico so, together with interline partners, it can cover the whole continent.


is a more direct and cleaner process.” Taylor agreed: “Every state is different, so you do not have one set of rules that fits all states. On road, you have to deal with each state individually as they have different regulations on surveys, analysis, escorts and so on.”


New business With traditional markets falling, everyone is looking for new shippers. Felix stated that SRT has seen the petrochemical business grow slightly but that it is also looking beyond the oversize market.


“General commodities or smaller units are not as exciting to move but we talk to customers, see what they want and pattern our services to meet their needs. One new service can lead to another and helps generate new income streams. SRT also has a trucking division which is doing quite brisk business.”


Hoffmann said: “We talk to customers to look at ways they can adapt their products so that they fit the profile for transport by rail.


98 May/June 2018


The [USA’s] economy has been doing a heck of a lot better in the last six to eight months. It has been driven by the change in administration and getting a president who is pro-business. – Bill Taylor, Colossal Transport Solutions


“The process is very complicated and pieces are getter bigger, so it has been a very collaborative activity involving several different levels – government, equipment manufacturers, EPCs and other specialists,” explained Thornton. “We do not just look at the movement itself but also try to help find marshalling areas or places where assembly, manufacturing or even erection can be done.” With unit-trains up to 75 railcars long, there are many operational challenges. “Not only do we have the dimensions of the cargo to consider, we have to design a service plan that causes the least disruption to other trains, considering that wind components are outsized cargo that have restriction on speed and where they can pass other trains.”


The planners have to ensure that the trains


carrying these specialised loads do not interfere with other freight trains passing in the other direction, or get overtaken by faster moving trains along the route. These over-dimensional loads are subject to speed restrictions, presenting the operating challenge of one train travelling at 10-25 mph while the others on the route may travel at twice those speeds or more. Thornton expects the region’s major wind farm


construction to be completed in the next five years or so, but there is always a requirement for replacement parts. Other construction activity, including major energy projects, bridge construction and mass transit projects, will continue to keep CN Rail busy.


It could be just a few centimetres that need to be changed. Then they will be able to take advantage of the reliability and lower costs that we can offer by rail compared with road. We have the right rail wagons and technical ability to work with customers to sort out the best solutions.”


Flores said his company will work with shippers at an early stage to discuss the shipment “and hopefully they will go back to their engineering departments to design the piece within the constraints”. He also believed that a new wave of logistics managers, often replacing the existing workers that are reaching retirement age, might be more open to using rail rather than road.


“It is a good opportunity for us to come in and educate the new generation about the advantages of using rail for high and wide freight.” Felix agreed: “I am optimistic that things are picking up and that heavy rail transport will improve in the future.”


HLPFI www.heavyliftpfi.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166