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COUNTRY REPORTNETHERLANDS


will be installed at the wind farm, which is located approximately 45 km north of the German coast in the North Sea. Buss will be responsible for the planning,


transport and interim storage at the terminal, as well as pre-assembly and subsequent delivery of the components to the quayside, ready for loadout. Starting in spring 2019, rotor blades measuring approximately 75 m in length, tower segments, and 32 nacelles will be transported successively to the Orange Blue Terminal. Around 80,000 sq m of the 250,000 sq m


terminal will be used for the storage, handling and pre-assembly of the components. In its vision for the year 2030 report,


NWEA also said that there needs to be an adjustment of policies for onshore wind energy after 2020. It stated that the national renewable energy target must be translated to regional targets and an area-specific approach – in which financial responsibility is shifted to each respective region. Nuclear energy, meanwhile, still provides


approximately 10 percent of the electricity used in the Netherlands. While the Borssele nuclear power station is the only operational plant in the country, there are currently no plans to build any new nuclear units.


Energy production But, as the Netherlands continues to import electricity from nuclear plants elsewhere – notably France and Germany – the Dutch government is taking steps to boost sustainable energy production and find smarter ways of using and saving energy. Further still, the country’s gas reserves


are running out. Once the fifth-largest natural gas exporter in the world, the Netherlands will become a net importer of gas by 2025 and become more dependent on coal and oil imports. With its longstanding engineering


expertise, a number of companies based in the Netherlands have been responsible for a variety of innovations in the heavy lift and project forwarding sector. Hengelo-based Enerpac, for example, designs and manufacturers hydraulic lifting tools for a range of heavy lifting applications. The latest innovation from Enerpac is its


RLT-Series of low-height, telescopic, hydraulic lifting cylinders. Enerpac said the units are designed for applications requiring a long cylinder stroke in confined spaces, which are commonly found during machinery positioning and tool fastening. The company has also made some major


investments at its Hengelo manufacturing site over the past 12 months. This, according to Enerpac, has resulted in a significant


www.heavyliftpfi.com BigLift Barentsz transporting a jack-up rig.


reduction in delivery times and enabled it to manufacture equipment for stock. One of its latest product ranges – the


Super Lift hydraulic gantries – is available immediately, said Enerpac. Launched in December 2018, the SL100 and SL200 gantries feature lifting capacities of 100 tons (90.7 tonnes) and 200 tons (181.4 tonnes) respectively, as well as two-stage lift cylinders and maximum lifting heights of up to 4.75 m (SL100) and 6.7 m (SL200). Typical applications for the SL system include the transportation and installation of presses, machine tools, electrical transformers and injection moulding machines, added Enerpac. Meanwhile, engineered transport


provider and heavy lifting specialist ALE’s research and development team in Breda has designed a modular transport frame for the handling of transition pieces at ports. The system is capable of transporting


transition pieces weighing in excess of 600 tonnes without the need for cranes. “Offshore renewables is a huge growth


market for us and we wanted to ensure we had the optimal solution for port handling operations for our clients,” explained Tomas Villarino, technical sales manager at ALE. For Timmers at the port of Rotterdam,


the country’s strong export base continues to be driven by power equipment suppliers,


We have had several positive sessions with Groningen Seaports and we are both confident that this new terminal will be an additional asset for the market. – Ludolf Reijntjes, BOW Terminal


for example generators and transformers, as well as equipment and machinery for the maritime industry. “This will continue throughout 2019; we do not anticipate any changes here,” added Timmers. Yet, many active in the supply chain do


not expect a return to the heady days of large mega-projects; cargoes available on the market today, such as modules for the oil and gas sector, are often smaller than those seen at the height of the energy sector boom. The transport activities at the lower end


of the market have forced the Netherlands- headquartered Royal Boskalis Westminster to retire some closed-stern heavy transport vessels. The Dutch company said the decline in operating results for the first half of the year, compared with the same period in 2017, was largely attributable to a sharp drop in the result of its offshore energy division.


Prospects in Africa Still, many Dutch carriers are more optimistic about the opportunities in the project cargo supply chain, with some looking to capitalise on the promising prospects in Africa. With a focus on the West African market,


UAL Netherlands added the multipurpose vessel UAL Fortitude to its fleet. “We are very excited to have this new ship in our fleet,” said Harald Maas, director, UAL Netherlands. “The oil and gas industry is putting more


and more demands on the lifting capacity of our vessels, and this latest addition will ensure UAL maintains its position as the leading carrier for the oil and gas industry in West Africa for years to come. We are looking for further expansion of our fleet in the very near future, especially in the heavy lift segment.”


January/February 2019


HLPFI 95


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