search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
INDUSTRY REVIEWONSHORE RENEWABLE POWER GENERATION


hot and cold A


Renewables investment blows


The onshore renewable energy industry is continuing to experience fluctuating levels of investment in new projects around the world, with trends being driven by frequently changing economic and political influences. Phil Hastings reports.


picture of mixed investment in new onshore renewable energy projects over the last couple of years was highlighted in a recent International Energy Agency


(IEA) report. On the positive side, it said solar photovoltaic (PV) investment during 2017 had risen to record levels. On the downside, though, onshore wind investment, by value, had fallen nearly 15 percent, with lower deployment in the USA, China and Brazil, “though one-third of this decline stemmed from falling investment costs”. Investment in hydropower around the


world had also dropped by 30 percent in 2017 “to its lowest level in over a decade, with a slowdown in China, Brazil and Southeast Asia”, the report added.


Cautious outlook In a more up-to-date assessment of the overall worldwide renewable energy sector, a report published in November 2018 by Ernst & Young (EY), a global assurance, tax, transaction and advisory services provider, suggested leading markets remain “cautious” amid “geopolitical uncertainty and technology disruption”. As examples, it cited trade tensions


between China and the USA, “including the US government’s introduction of 30 percent tariffs on solar panel imports”, and the UK’s investment in renewables falling 46 percent year on year in the third quarter of 2018 “amid speculation around how the outcome of Brexit [the country’s planned departure from the European Union in March 2019] will impact power exports to the EU and the price of imported equipment.” The EY report also highlighted


78 January/February 2019


Germany used to be the biggest national wind power market for us, but right now that business has pretty much stopped completely. – Stijn Sarens, Sarens


developments in India where progress towards achieving a national target of 100GW of solar power is being hampered by trade uncertainty. Stijn Sarens, key account manager power


plant segment for Sarens, provided confirmation of the varied picture relating to global investment in onshore wind projects. For example, he said the once-large


German onshore wind energy sector has dropped away to virtually nothing at the moment. “Germany used to be the biggest national wind power market for us, but right now that business has pretty much stopped completely,” he commented. The main factor behind that change is


the introduction of a new public auction system for the right to develop new onshore wind farms above a certain size, which does not include any obligation on the bid winners to start building. “That has resulted in a gap of about a year and a half in new projects coming through, but I think that market will begin to move again during 2019,” he stated.


Upcoming projects More positively, the onshore wind energy market remains strong in a number of other European countries, notably France, the Netherlands and Spain. “In Spain, for example, we will start on a big project during the early part of 2019. That is a good thing for us because we will be able to relocate our fleet of approximately ten cranes in Germany to work on that project.” Elsewhere in the world, the onshore


wind energy market is currently strong in Australia, Stijn Sarens added. Another specific example of the impact


changing government policies can have on investment in new onshore wind farms came from David Collett, managing director of Collett & Sons. “Following the UK government’s


decision to abandon the feed-in tariff subsidy [payments to owners of renewable energy generators at a fixed rate per unit of electricity produced] for onshore wind, we fully expected, and duly experienced, a downturn in the onshore wind market during the second half of 2017 and through 2018,” he explained. “However, we expect 2019 to be the start


of onshore wind recovery plans, through larger subsidy-free projects being consented. The reality of this, though, is that 2019 looks


www.heavyliftpfi.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150