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REGIONAL REPORTWEST COAST NORTH AMERICA


In November 2018, the port of Bellingham signed a


three-year service contract with Ports America.


for processing or packaging, and thence to the rest of the country. Clark likes the idea not just for any


volumes it would bring, but also because it would rebuild the rail link that the port lost many years ago. He is also sanguine about getting some of the project cargo for the LNG plant planned at Kitimat. “That port is limited,” he said. “With the refineries nearby, we have the experienced labour pool, space, and resources for kitting up the modules and components. They would then be taken to Kitimat by barge.”


LNG Canada Energy major Shell reached a final investment decision on LNG Canada during October 2018, a project that is valued at USD31 billion. Fluor’s joint venture with JGC Corporation will provide the engineering, procurement, fabrication and construction on the project, which still faces opposition in certain political quarters. At the far southern end of the coast, the


port of San Diego is investing USD24 million to modernise its Tenth Avenue Marine Terminal. “This is to attract more liner services to southern California,” said Miguel Reyes, senior marine trade manager. “The redevelopment focuses on established strengths of handling breakbulk and heavy lift cargoes, as well as refrigerated containers and dry cargo.”


www.heavyliftpfi.com The plan includes the demolition of two


underused transit sheds to create open space, and upgrades to the existing rail facility. Long-term possibilities include additional rail infrastructure and cranes. While the Pacific Northwest is focused


on inbound energy project cargoes, the port of San Diego has performed oil and gas export projects for a San Diego-based company, Solar Turbines. “Oil and gas equipment is exported from the Tenth Avenue and National City marine terminals on an inducement basis,” said Reyes. “Most of the oil and gas heavy lift and project cargoes are bound for Russia and Southeast Asia.” Which is not to say inbounds are out of


bounds. “Actually project cargo in San Diego has mostly been imports, primarily from Asia and Europe,” said Reyes. “However, we are looking for regional export cargo opportunities as we attract more liner services to the port’s Tenth Avenue Marine


We are well positioned to handle wind energy project cargo. Last year the port supported a major project for Vestas. –Miguel Reyes, port of San Diego


and National City marine terminals. Most of the heavy lift import opportunities that the port has handled have an inelastic demand; therefore we are not expecting any major volume declines in this segment over the short term.”


Record year With the production tax credit due to expire in next year, 2019 is projected to be a record year for onshore wind energy projects in the USA. “In discussing projects with major OEMs, they are expecting an influx of components coming to the West and Gulf coasts next year, mainly from Asia and Europe,” Reyes explained. “We are well positioned to handle wind


energy project cargo,” he said. “Last year the port supported a major project for Vestas, a Danish manufacturer of wind turbines, where more than 300 tower and blade components were moved by rail and truck to the Mojave Desert.” To strengthen its heavy lift position, San


Diego established a partnership with G2 Ocean in May 2018. The carrier has established a monthly liner service connecting northern Europe and the Tenth Avenue Marine Terminal, via the Panama Canal. The base cargo of this service includes steel coils, beams, plates, project cargo such as engines and turbines, plus bulk and bagged fertiliser.


January/February 2019


HLPFI 73


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