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COUNTRY REPORTTURKEY


Project updates


TANAP, the 1,850 km gas pipeline project built jointly by Turkey and Azerbaijan over three years, entered operation in June 2018. This pipeline provides Turkey with 12 percent of the gas it needs, as well as supplying other European countries. Meanwhile, the TurkStream project will supply


Turkey and European countries with Russian gas, to be moved across the Black Sea through a 910 km- long pipeline, which includes a 260 km section through Turkish land. The final pipe on the Turkish coast was installed in November 2018, marking the completion of one of the four gas lines planned for the project. Turkey’s first nuclear power plant, meanwhile, being built in Mersin, is due to be finished in 2023.


project cargo opportunities. “Turkey has become a hub for wind tower and blade manufacturers, with some of the world’s largest building factories in the country.” For the heavy haulage companies in


Turkey, onshore wind energy projects are currently their bread and butter. One industry executive suggested that these smaller movements are keeping the equipment running.


Energy developments Although Turkey is blessed with natural resources, Medini emphasised that the country remains reliant on neighbouring countries such as Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and Russia for its natural gas. “The amount spent to import these sources keeps increasing the country’s debt.” In a bid to tackle the imbalance, the


government has purchased the first Turkish drillship; this has been exploring for oil around Antalya, off the southern coast of Turkey, and in the East Mediterranean. The minister of energy and natural resources said that second drillship was purchased and put into operation in the Black Sea during December 2018. Gold mines are another area that has


been keeping Medden busy. “We have been assigned to handle and deliver cargo for two mines, one located in the eastern region and the other one in Marmara region,” said Medini. Turkey’s infrastructure has improved


tremendously over the past 15 years and the country now has European-standard ports in every region connecting with major roads, said Ercengiz at ATA Freight. A rail privatisation programme is ongoing.


52 January/February 2019


Turkey’s infrastructure has improved tremendously over the past 15 years and the country now has European- standard ports in every region connecting with major roads. –Feyza Ercengiz, ATA Freight Line


This has cemented the country’s position


as an East-West transhipment hub, as well as to the Middle East and CIS countries. “We have seen a significant improvement in port infrastructure and the supply of transport equipment. The new airport will serve as a major hub with its huge capacity in the region,” she added. Some of the companies interviewed by


Despite clear challenges, 2018 proved to be a


satisfactory year for Bati.


HLPFI drew attention to the amount of non-compliant companies active in the Turkish market and their pressure on price. At Bati Group, Aydin said that some of


these inexperienced companies are unable to perform as they have promised. “This issue leads to target rates that are impossible to sustain while preserving quality at the same time.”


Unnecessary chaos Medini at Medden added: “We believe that it becomes dysfunctional when competitors are not qualified enough but still claim they can provide the same services at a lower cost. This only creates unnecessary chaos and imbalance – unrealistic target rates, poor service, and confused clients trying to decide over quality and quantity.” She said: “We understand that numbers


are all that matters at the end of the day for clients, but we also believe that there are certain standards that must be maintained at all times. For instance, we do not work with a supplier that we have not heard of, even if the rate we receive is cheaper than others. We only work with suppliers who are up to our standards and whom we can 100 percent trust. I am sure we have lost business because of this principle but I would prefer to lose business instead of engaging in an activity that would jeopardise our position and reputation in the market.”


HLPFI www.heavyliftpfi.com


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