search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
more news at www.heavyliftpfi.com


NEWBUILDFOCUS


The vessel will have a loading deck area of 3,600 sq m, an overall length of 148.5 m and a width of 28 m.


Steel cut for innovative deck carrier designed by HeavyLift@Sea


Hamburg-based engineering company HeavyLift@Sea has designed a deck carrier that overcomes the challenges facing vessels that need to call at small ports or transit narrow waterways while transporting heavy and oversized cargoes. Sophie Barnes reports.


HeavyLift@Sea to transport heavy cargo and large modules, as well as components that cannot be lifted by crane. Cargoes will be rolled on to the loading deck, eliminating the need to deploy heavy-duty cranes.


T


Design brief “Our client for this project, a Hamburg-based shipping company specialising in offshore wind projects, is already operating a deck carrier, which is to be supplemented by a more flexible, high-performance newbuild,” explained Hendrik Gröne, managing director of HeavyLift@Sea. He added that the vessel will initially transport components


24 January/February 2019


he DC 10000, which is being built at a Chinese shipyard, was designed by


for offshore wind projects in the North and Baltic seas. For these projects, the vessel


will be calling at a small Danish port, said HeavyLift@Sea. The team therefore simulated these conditions at a shipbuilding test


facility in Copenhagen and included the results in the design’s calculations. “There were a number of


requirements for this ship that seemed to be mutually exclusive


There were a number of requirements for this ship that seemed to be mutually exclusive at first.


– Hendrik Gröne, HeavyLift@Sea


at first,” explained Gröne. “The width of the required cargo deck had to be reconciled with a ship width that was small enough for the approach to this particularly small Danish port. At the same time, in order for the ship to pass


through the Kiel Canal, it had to be taken into account that the deck could not be wider than the waterline.” The vessel will have a loading


deck area of 3,600 sq m, an overall length of 148.5 m and a width of 28 m. According to HeavyLift@Sea, this was achieved, in part, by designing the deckhouse superstructures, which can accommodate a crew of 21, to be as compact as possible. The flat deck will also feature


a high load-bearing capacity of 20 tonnes per sq m, with a


maximum load capacity of approximately 10,000 tonnes. While reaching a speed of


around 12 knots, the propulsion also exceeds current environmental requirements with exhaust gas purification using a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) active emissions control technology system.


DP2-equipped HeavyLift@Sea added that the vessel will also be equipped with a DP2 system, making it suitable for work on highly complex offshore energy projects. The steel-cutting ceremony


for the heavy cargo deck carrier was held at the end of November 2018. The vessel is scheduled for delivery at the end of 2019. The HeavyLift@Sea team


based in Veritaskai, Hamburg-Harburg, meanwhile, has secured a contract for the basic design of another specialised vessel for offshore wind energy transportation operations.


HLPFI www.heavyliftpfi.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150