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EQUIPMENTINSIGHT more news at www.heavyliftpfi.com


would have a lifting capacity of less than 40 tonnes, but the company is seeing an increase in the number of units in the 40-100 tonnes capacity range. Currently, Combilift is fitting Tier 4 Final


engines in the models going to the USA in order to comply with the environmental regulations coming into force. For European machines, Combilift is fitting units with Stage 5 emission engines to meet regulations that will be implemented at the start of 2020. Increasing environmental concerns and


the need to reduce emissions when executing heavy handling operations has also seen an increase in green solutions from the mobile harbour crane (MHC) segment. Philipp Helberg, marketing manager for


maritime cranes at Liebherr in Rostock, Germany, expects Europe to develop into a


strong market for electric units. “Demand for emission-free handling systems is growing,” he added. In 2018, the manufacturer launched its


first fully electric-powered portal crane, the LPS 420 E. Equipped with two winches, each with a powerful 190 kW electric motor, the LPS 420 E provides a maximum load capacity of up to 124 tonnes. Therefore, the portal crane can be used to lift heavy breakbulk as well as project and general cargo, said Liebherr. All crane movements, including luffing, hoisting, slewing and travelling, are completed by the electric motors.


Good year In general, business has been better than expected for Liebherr. In addition to its MHC department, Helberg said that the company’s other business units have also had a good year. Demand for its cranes over the last three years has been low, largely due to the market conditions in the oil and gas and shipbuilding sectors, explained Helberg. He added: “In that time, we did our


homework. The result was a positive 2018, and a healthy orderbook for 2019.” Liebherr’s LHM 550 and 420 MHCs, with


lifting capacities of 154 tonnes and 124tonnes, respectively, have been the models in highest demand. There has also been an increase in orders for the 308-tonne capacity LHM 800, the company’s flagship model. “We delivered four machines in 2018 and


have two on order for 2019, reflecting the high demand for heavy cargo handling equipment,” said Helberg. Liebherr is seeing strong demand for its


MHCs in Africa, the UK, Italy and Russia. While Europe is the manufacturer’s largest market, Helberg said that North America and Africa are showing strong sales growth.


140 January/February 2019


A Konecranes Gottwald Model 6 mobile harbour crane lifting an oversized component in Sweden.


According to Helberg, the range of


competitors in the MHC market segment is getting wider. Notably, he drew attention to the merger of Konecranes and Terex’s material handling and port solutions (MHPS) business in January 2017. The largest and most powerful crane from


Konecranes’ range of MHCs is the Gottwald Model 8. Available in a number of variants, the unit has a maximum lifting capacity of 200 tonnes and a maximum working radius of 64 m. When two of these models are working on a tandem lift operation, they are capable of lifting loads weighing up to 400 tonnes. “The Model 8 crane is extremely rugged,


making it a universal crane for all applications requiring top handling performance. It has the ability to carry out duties normally reserved for large, custom-built handling equipment,” explained Konecranes. Like all of Konecranes’ family of MHCs, the


model is equipped with a range of features that improve productivity and eco-efficiency for cargo handling in ports and terminals. Special, optional features include load


guidance systems, tandem lift assistant and vertical lift assistant. The use of energy-efficient hybrid drive


units or external power sources also significantly improves the efficiency of the drive system and helps reduce the environmental impact. Peter Klein, senior marketing manager at


Konecranes in Düsseldorf, Germany, explained: “The great benefit of MHCs is that they require virtually no infrastructure since the cranes are self-contained and feature diesel generator sets. If you want more eco-efficient equipment, then you can purchase a hybrid model which recovers the energy from the lowering and braking motions. This energy is then stored and is made available for the next work cycle”.


External power supply Another option for operators, according to Klein, is connecting the MHC to an external power supply so that no further energy conversion is required. External power from the terminal’s electricity supply increases the efficiency of the drive and eliminates


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