search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
combined capacity of 200 MW, as it tries to diversify its energy mix away from hydroelectric power. The 200 MW would reportedly be split into small projects, each with a maximum size of 20 MW. In December 2018, the 33


kV Muchinji-Chipata power line was commissioned, which will supply Malawi with 20 MW of power to help mitigate the region’s electricity deficit. Transport engineering


specialist Sarens recently confirmed its commitment to the growing Zambian construction market by establishing a partnership with Shumba, which is active in earthworks and civil works in the African nation. Jonathan Greenway, sales


representative for Sarens South Africa, explained that there is growing potential in Lusaka’s construction sector, as well as opportunities in wind energy and mining across the country. In order to support the


partnership, Sarens South Africa has established a depot just outside the Zambian capital and mobilised four all-terrain cranes – ranging in capacity between 55 and 90 tonnes – from Johannesburg to the new site. Meanwhile, Switzerland-


headquartered logistics provider M+R Spedag Group, whose subsidiary Spedag Interfreight is very active in the East African market, unveiled expansion plans in 2018 with decisions to open offices in Zambia, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Burundi. The group intends to serve various industries, including


Our first foray into Zambia was imports of containerised and breakbulk cargo to Lusaka and then to the Zambian Copperbelt...


– Dhiren Krishna, GSF Trucking


www.heavyliftpfi.com


energy, infrastructure and relief logistics, adding that oil and gas activities are gaining momentum in the region. Spedag is also offering its


African clients real-time tracking of cargoes, including over-dimensional freight, with a new system called PeriSpoor. Developed in partnership with Switzerland-based Periplus, the system was launched during November 2018, at events hosted in Kigali, Rwanda, and Kampala, Uganda. PeriSpoor is based on


distributed ledger technology. The developers said that they are working on a private blockchain solution to verify and provide signed delivery orders, in real time, to Spedag customers.


Copperbelt growth Earlier in 2018, South Africa- based logistics provider GSF Trucking suggested that freight volumes to and from the continent’s copperbelt, which borders northern Zambia and the southern DRC, are growing three times faster than those within South Africa. The company’s managing


director, Dhiren Krishna, said that GSF is seeing growth in both export and import volumes to the DRC and Zambia, which it attributed to economic growth in both countries, with increases in demand for mining and resources. “Our first foray into Zambia


was imports of containerised and breakbulk cargo to Lusaka and then to the Zambian Copperbelt, with an unprofitable empty leg back to Zimbabwe, where we already had an established client base, to load back to South Africa,” said Krishna. With a presence in both


Zambia and the DRC, GSF’s Krishna said that export volumes from Zambia have now begun to grow and the company is looking forward to increasing its offering – including abnormal load and turnkey project management services – in both countries.


FROM BEYOND THE HORIZON


PeriSpoor: Real-time tracking covering East Africa and beyond


From or to any seaport of the globe to or from any location in Eastern Africa, Spedag Interfreight customers can track their goods both by mobile app and web application, showing the position in real-time.


Spedag Interfreight Uganda Ltd. Plot M284


Nakawa Industrial Area P.O. Box 4555 Kampala


www.spedaginterfreight.com +41 58 677 77 77


info@spedaginterfreight.com HLPFI January/February 2019 129


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150