search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
FROM OUR CORRESPONDENTSUB-SAHARAN AFRICA


South Africa implemented a series of forced blackouts at the end of last year due to capacity shortages, bringing the country’s troubled energy sector back into focus. Elsewhere in sub-Saharan Africa, the growing demand for power is creating opportunity for the region’s logistics providers.


Wind turbines in South Africa, which continues to be plagued by electricity shortages.


Addressing Africa’s energy and infrastructure shortfall


Kurt Bronkhurst, our correspondent in SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA


sub-Saharan Africa as a whole could accelerate infrastructure development to keep pace with the continent’s growing population and rapid urbanisation. According to the African Union


A


Commission, the poor state of infrastructure in sub-Saharan Africa reduces national economic growth by 2 percent and productivity by as much as 40 percent.


Programme of projects The PIDA Priority Action Plan (PAP) – a ten-year strategy launched in 2012, includes a programme of projects and development strategies aimed at promoting regional integration across the four target sectors – energy, transport, water and technology. The cost of delivering PIDA PAP is estimated at USD68 billion. The plan


www.heavyliftpfi.com


t the 2018 Programme for Infrastructure Development in Africa (PIDA) Week, held at the end of last year in Zimbabwe, experts discussed how


comprises more than 400 projects in 51 cross-border programmes, out of which approximately one third are operational or under construction. Executives at the meeting suggested that


the region should be able to achieve its developmental aspirations if the percentage of projects under construction increased from 32 to 50 percent. The October 2018 issue of Africa’s Pulse,


the bi-annual analysis of the state of African economies by the World Bank, suggested


To accelerate and sustain an inclusive growth momentum, policymakers must continue to focus on investments that foster human capital, reduce resource misallocation and boost productivity. – Albert Zeufack, World Bank


that sub-Saharan African economies are slowly recovering from the slowdown seen in 2015-16. The average GDP growth rate in the region is estimated at 2.7 percent in 2018, which represents a slight increase from 2.3 percent in 2017.


Recovery in progress “The region’s economic recovery is in progress but at a slower pace than expected,” said Albert Zeufack, World Bank chief economist for Africa. “To accelerate and sustain an inclusive growth momentum, policymakers must continue to focus on investments that foster human capital, reduce resource misallocation and boost productivity. Policymakers in the region must equip themselves to manage new risks arising from changes in the composition of capital flows and debt.” Slow growth is partially a reflection of a


less favourable external environment for the region, said the report. Global trade and industrial activity lost momentum, as metals and agricultural prices fell due to concerns about trade tariffs and weakening demand prospects. While oil prices have rallied from the lows seen in 2016, metals prices could remain subdued amid muted demand, particularly from China. Financial market


January/February 2019 127


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150
Produced with Yudu - www.yudu.com