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REGIONAL REPORTSOUTH AMERICA


Soreidom expects an increase in project


shipments to Guyana as offshore activity picks up.


Guyana poised for oil production take-off


Bep van der Velde, line manager at Soreidom, is confident that Guyana will be an interesting destination in the coming decades as oil production ramps up. “Presently cargo is not yet booming but this will


change, probably from 2019,” she said, noting that many project studies are under way. She expects the majority of project cargo shipments for developments in the region will come from Houston. ExxonMobil began oil and gas exploration in


Guyana during 2008 and has, so far, made ten oil discoveries in the 26,800 sq km Stabroek Block, which is operated by ExxonMobil affiliate Esso Exploration and Production Guayana. The first discovery was at Liza in May 2015 and the most recent was at the Hammerhead-1 well in August 2018.


Liza Phase I is expected to begin producing oil


by early 2020. It will use the Liza Destiny FPSO vessel to produce up to 120,000 barrels of oil per day (bdp), ExxonMobil said. “Construction of the FPSO and subsea


equipment is well advanced,” the company confirmed.” Phase II could be sancitoned in the near future. It will use a second FPSO designed to produce up to 220,000 bpd and is expected to enter service by 2022. “A third development, Payara, will target


sanctioning in 2019 and use an FPSO designed to produce approximately 180,000 bpd as early as


106 January/February 2019 2023,” he added. Earlier in 2018, ExxonMobil revised its estimate


for the Stabroek Block up to 4 billion oil-equivalent barrels, following completion of testing at the Liza-5 appraisal well, a discovery at Ranger, incorporation of the eighth discovery, Longtail, into the Turbot area evaluation and completion of the Pacora discovery evaluation. The previous recoverable resource estimate was 3.2 billion oil-equivalent barrels.


Potential Based on the collective discoveries on the Stabroek Block to date, ExxonMobil sees potential for up to five FPSOs producing over 750,000 bpd by 2025. Van der Velde noted that there is a lack of


onshore equipment for handling heavy lift shipments in Guyana, and this goes for other locations in the vicinity too. For instance: “French Guyana is more or less the same as Guyana. The port we serve up the Maroni River [Saint Laurent du Maroni] has no shore cranes; neither has Degrad des Cannes [Cayenne] in the north. “Suriname [Paramaribo] has three Gottwald cranes and one Liebherr. North Brazil [Macapa] has no shore cranes either – but we use ship’s gear,” she said.


Also nearby, Trinidad and Tobago shows


potential. Artusi said tenders for the installation of four wells at the Angelin offshore gasfield will open in 2019, for instance, while downstream, a methanol plant at La Brea is under construction.


generate all the power they need to operate, and then sell the rest to the grid. With 2019 being an election year, Keller


expects the Argentinian government to approve and implement a number of projects. “According to official documents, investments of USD4.7 billion in public works are expected, 258 percent more than in 2018.” Keller highlighted various areas of


investment across Argentina, including: • The national transportation plan that aims to build 6,000 km of highways in the medium term;


• A public transport infrastructure plan that will seek to take the Metrobus to more cities across the country, as well as building 400 km of railways and renewing eight airports;


• The national water plan and national housing and habitat plan involving 250 sanitation works;


• An energy plan that aims to achieve a diversified energy portfolio. A total of 147 renewable energy projects have been awarded, including wind, solar, biogas and biomass. In addition, there are hydrocarbon and power generation projects, and gas pipelines planned from Vaca Muerta to Rosario and Buenos Aires;


• Vaca Muerta itself – the second-largest source of shale gas in the world – has investments of USD7.9 billion expected in various projects during 2019.


Colombia renewables Elsewhere, the largest projects coming online in Colombia in the coming years will be focused on renewable energies, Keller said. “The environmental licence for the


largest wind project in the country was approved this month and there are applications for environmental licences for


www.heavyliftpfi.com


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