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OPERATIONAL REVIEWWEATHER FORECASTING


electronic chart display and information system (ECDIS) navigation chart data.


Communications visibility “Having Globecomm VSAT onboard makes managing demand for crew and our business communications simpler and more efficient. When you have a fleet of 132 ships you need visibility. The next step will be for us to have better access to the vessel systems. It is hard for a small IT department to monitor everything that is happening, but we want to be able to respond, not just after we are aware of any potential problems,” said Börchers.


Having Globecomm VSAT onboard makes managing demand for crew and our business communications simpler and more efficient. When you have a fleet of 132 ships you need visibility. – Holger Börchers, Briese Schiffahrts


www.heavyliftpfi.com


Technology companies are constantly making updates and enhancements to their systems. ABB, for instance, has rolled out a new functionality for its marine advisory system – OCTOPUS-Onboard. The system delivers real-time vessel monitoring, and supports vessel route planning, speed optimisation, heading and fuel consumption.


It also provides motion monitoring, vessel response prediction, heavy weather decision support, and weather window evaluation, using accelerometers installed onboard a vessel.


The latest addition to the system will help project cargo shipowners to estimate


the expected forces that the cargo will encounter in transit – without the need to preconfigure the system for each new project. This allows shipowners with limited in-house engineering capabilities to cut configuration costs, while delivering the same high-quality motion forecasts as the traditional OCTOPUS set-up. Tim Ellis, marketing manager at ABB, said: “The main benefits of the system are the user-friendliness for configuring, which leads to fewer engineering hours.” Ellis said that the response from the market regarding the new function has been positive so far.


HLPFI Collecting ocean data


Ongoing oceanographic research is providing information for the development of new offshoire wind energy projects. For instance, French floating wind power pioneer EOLFI Group introduced BLIDAR, its sea weather buoy, to the market in 2017. The buoy has been designed to measure offshore wind in all weather conditions. In November 2018, EOLFI delivered its weather buoy to the port of Tyne’s Riverside Quay, UK, where


scientific research equipment was installed. The 11-tonne unit was lifted and rotated using two mobile cranes. The BLIDAR was towed to the Blyth offshore wind demonstrator farm where it will collect vital oceanographic data for six months, before returning to the port of Tyne.


January/February 2019 99


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