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COUNTRY REPORTSPAIN


country’s new government is placing more emphasis on oil and gas projects such as the construction and refurbishment of refineries. Still, the Spanish engineered transport


management provider, through its Middle East office, has had a lot of work offshore in the Gulf of Mexico, and also has refinery projects lined up for the next couple of years in Peru. Closer to home, many of Coordinadora’s


Spanish clients have operations abroad, especially France, Germany, the Netherlands and Denmark, Hernández Gómez said. Earlier this year, Coordinadora was


selected to carry out the transport, load-out, dry towage and float-off operations relating to the Windfloat Atlantic manufacturing project led by Spanish shipbuilder Navantia. Designed by US-headquartered offshore


wind technology company Principle Power, which has subsidiaries in France and Portugal, Windfloat is a floating foundation for offshore wind turbines that enables them to be sited in waters deeper than 40 m. A full-scale 2 MW prototype has already


been installed off the Portuguese coast. A Windfloat unit is set for delivery at Fene


shipyard in Galicia later this year. Coordinadora will use SPMTs to roll the


Breakbulk & Project Cargo Logistics via


Windfloat unit from the manufacturing yard to the loading wharf. The foundation will then be transferred to a semi-submersible barge, which will then be towed to sheltered waters before the Windfloat unit is discharged.


European advantage Hernández Gómez observed that Northern Europe is home to highly specialised companies at the cutting edge of wind turbine development, and China is not yet able to compete with them. However, Marguisa’s Castillo said that


Spain is increasingly importing a great deal of wind turbines from China. For example, blades for the Torozos wind


farm, which is being developed by Vestas in the Castilla y Leon region of northern Spain, were transported from the Chinese port of Dafeng earlier this year. United Heavy Lift (UHL) handled the


transport of 156 wind turbine blades, measuring 60 m in length and weighing approximately 11 tonnes, from China to the Spanish port of Ferrol using the deck carrier Zhi Xian Zhi Xing. UHL said that this was the largest number of rotor blades that Vestas had ever shipped in a single consignment. It was also the first time that the company had


Bilbao PORT OF


Pérez Torres Marítima (PTM) in Ferrol recently loaded wind turbine blades measuring approximately 70 m in length.


Solar developments come to the fore


Developments in the design and size of solar power installations are opening up opportunities for project forwarders and heavy lift providers. Generally speaking, there is not enough sun or space to build such installations in mainland Europe, but the sector is picking up in the Spanish market, thanks to its favourable climate. As the country’s energy policy


moves away from traditional fuel sources towards clean or renewable power generation, solar installation will likely develop apace.


Cluster for the competitiveness and promotion of the PORT OF BILBAO and its companies


Alda. Urquijo, 9 - 1º D. 48008 Bilbao - SPAIN T +34 94 423 6782 I info@uniportbilbao.es I www.uniportbilbao.eus


Investment Speaking at the ground-breaking ceremony of the Núñez de Balboa photovoltaic (PV) plant in March, Ignacio Galán, chairman of Spanish utility Iberdrola, said the company plans to install another 2,000 MW of solar and wind power in Spain’s Extremadura region by 2022.


94 May/June 2019 Some projects in the region are


already in the advanced stage of development, including the Ceclavín, Arenales and Campo Arañuelo I and II PV plants.


PV project As for the Núñez de Balboa plant, when complete, it will feature 500 MW of installed capacity, which Iberdrola claims is the largest PV project under construction in Spain and Europe. At the ceremony Galán said: “This renewable mega-facility will become the spearhead that will consolidate the leadership position of Extremadura, Spain and the European Union in the transition to a more sustainable energy system.” The projects under development


in Extremadura and the rest of Spain form part of the EUR34 billion (USD38.4 billion) global investments that Iberdrola will make between 2018 and 2022.


www.heavyliftpfi.com


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