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COMMENT


Send all news and press releases to: editorial@heavyliftpfi.com


Editor - David Kershaw dk@heavyliftpfi.com News editor - Sophie Barnes sb@heavyliftpfi.com


Correspondents: Ian Cochran, Phil Hastings, Felicity Landon, Chris Lewis, Megan Ramsay and Keith Wallis in the UK Joseph R Fonsecain India Nicola Capuzzo in Italy Debbie Owenin South Africa Dave / Iain MacIntyrein New Zealand Gregory DL Morris and Sarah Fowler in the USA Ian Putzger and Leo Ryanin Canada Sam Whelanin Southeast Asia


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The only constant is change


verticals that project logisticians service are as unpredictable as ever. One certainty is that the world needs more power generation capacity using


A


a range of fuels, both renewable and non-renewable. More than 7 billion people roam the planet today and that number is growing 2 percent annually, creating demand for an additional 100 GW of power each year. As such, cost-conscious (often developing) nations continue to opt for coal


and gas-fired power units. Despite an international appetite for clean power, non-renewables still have a long-term role to play in the international power mix (see our non-renewable power generation report on p38). In the oil and gas sector, Anadarko entered into a definitive merger agreement with Chevron during


April only to turn on a sixpence to resume negotiations with Occidental Petroleum, which had previously made a hostile takeover offer for the oil driller. The bidding war for Anadarko reflects an intense desire by oil companies large and small to acquire


the USA’s best shale assets, specifically in West Texas’ Permian Basin. The role that US developers will play in the future of the energy sector cannot be understated. At


present, as prices tick up past USD75 per barrel, most expect another flurry of capital to flow into US tight oil, ramping up output and deflating prices. It is no longer a case of increasing oil prices sparking a wave of final investment decisions (FID) into global oil projects. LNG liquefaction projects, however, continue to garner a great deal of interest; Anadarko’s LNG


export facility in Mozambique is expected to achieve a positive FID this year. Philip Adkins, ceo of Red Box Energy Services, expects as many as six large-scale projects to be approved over the next 18-24months, which would create a wealth of modularised transportation opportunities (see our ships and shipping lines supplement). Another prominent feature of this edition is China and its increasingly dominant role in both major


capital projects (via its Belt and Road Initiative) and the wider logistics supply chain. In many cases, Chinese manufacturers have sister companies that undertake their project logistics


activities, a trend that is putting increased pressure on the traditional Westernised freight forwarding model. How project logisticians are adapting in this increasingly hostile operating environment is covered in


detail throughout this edition, and will continue to be a core focus for HLPFI in the time ahead. David Kershaw, Editor


dapting to constantly changing conditions is commonplace for those active in the heavy lift and project logistics market. It is just one feature that makes it such an intriguing business to observe and report on. Since our last issue, some of the more pessimistic projections for the world economy have dissipated. Nevertheless, the industry


Our front cover shows Beluga Projects Logistic handling a Huisman crane, shipped by sea and river from Varna, Bulgaria, to Baku, Azerbaijan. The total consignment weighed 1,250 tonnes.


2019 DVV MEDIA INTERNATIONAL: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means electronic, mechanical (including photocopying), recording or by any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission from the copyright owners. Multiple copying of the contents of this publication without prior written approval is not permitted. Heavy Lift & Project Forwarding International is published bi-monthly by DVV Media International Ltd, 6th Floor Chancery House, St Nicholas Way, Sutton, SM1 1JB, Great Britain. Origination and printing in Great Britain by Pensord Press Limited.


www.heavyliftpfi.com


May/June 2019


5


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