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REGIONAL REPORTMEXICO & CENTRAL AMERICA


latter is due to our customers trusting us with the delicate task of handling their engines.” Elsewhere, though, oil and gas is a


relatively small market. Few of the countries in the region have discovered extensive oil and gas resources; the exception is, of course, Guyana, where substantial amounts of oil have been found. Traditionally, the Central


America/Caribbean market for project logistics is largely based on power generation. Gantier feels there is huge potential in Mexico and Central America when it comes to increasing the number of solar and wind power installations. “Mexico has seen considerable


investments in areas such as Merida, Oaxaca, Coahuila, Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas to build wind farms,” he said. “In fact, given wind power has been growing rapidly in Mexico, several large multinational companies have been relying on DHL Global Forwarding Mexico to ship their wind energy-related cargo. We have even seen an interest in wind power projects out of Guatemala as well.


New wind farms “As of now, I expect new wind farms to pick up in Mexico – specifically Merida, Ocampo and Nuevo Leon – and in the Dominican Republic,” he added. And those are not the only locations


seeing investment in wind power. Roest recalled: “In 2008 we transported 11 turbines for the region’s first large wind power project located in Rivas, Nicaragua, at the border with Costa Rica on the Pacific side. Since then we have worked on multiple projects in Honduras, Panama, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic and Guatemala.” Examples include a project located near


Guatemala City at the base of active volcano Pacaya. On behalf of Vestas, Daco delivered 14 wind turbines to the Eolico San Antonio El Sitio (ESA) site in 2015. “Our next upcoming project is in the Dominican Republic and consists of 16


Making tracks


One infrastructure project in Mexico that has been subject to controversy is the Tren Maya (Maya Train) development, which will see over 1,500 km of railway line constructed through Quintana Roo, Tabasco, Campeche, Chiapas and Yucatan states and the introduction of hydrogen-powered trains to carry both passengers and freight.


56 May/June 2019


Mammoet rolled-off modules using SPMTs at Trinidad and Tobago’s Union


Industrial Estate, La Brea.


Vestas V136 132HH wind turbines,” Roest said. “The components are expected to arrive in Puerto Plata at the beginning of May 2019.” Aside from new wind projects, Daco also


does a substantial amount of work relating to the maintenance of existing wind farms. Indeed, earlier this year the company transported a blade from Santo Tomas de Castilla in Guatemala to Rivas in Nicaragua. The route traversed Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua. “Shortly after delivering this blade we moved a nacelle and tower sections from


As of now, I expect new wind farms to pick up in Mexico – specifically Merida, Ocampo and Nuevo Leon – and in the Dominican Republic.


– Eric Gantier, DHL Global Forwarding, Mexico Launched in December 2018, its aim is to boost


tourism, and thus employment, across the peninsula – which includes a World Heritage site, nature reserve and Mayan archaeological complex. However, there is opposition from local indigenous


groups and environmentalists. A substantial proportion – 60 percent – of the


total railway line consists of existing track that is to be rehabilitated as part of an ongoing programme. This


Puerto Cortes (Honduras) to the same project in Rivas near the border of Costa Rica,” Roest said. In Trinidad and Tobago, meanwhile,


Mitsubishi Heavy Industries recently contracted Mammoet to transport and install 120 pressure vessels and modules for the construction of Caribbean Gas Chemical Limited’s (CGCL) methanol and DME plant in southern Trinidad and Tobago’s Union Industrial Estate, La Brea.


Transport and installation The large items were moved as 22 shipments, over the course of a year. Using up to 96 axle-lines of SPMTs, the cargo was temporarily staged and then transported to the project site for final installation. The heaviest vessel weighed 610 tonnes,


Mammoet said. This was lifted by Mammoet’s CC8800-1 and CC2800-1 cranes working in tandem. Weighing 1,240 tonnes, the heaviest item, a reformer, was set onto foundations by SPMTs.


HLPFI does not require new permits and will constitute the


initial tranche of work, according to an interview with Rogelio Jiménez Pons of FONATUR (Mexico’s National Fund for Tourism Development) inEl Universal. The first phase of tenders in 2019 will be followed


by environmental studies; the second phase is slated for 2020. The Mexican government is reported to be diverting funds to accelerate the USD7.4 billion project, with the aim of completing it by 2023.


www.heavyliftpfi.com


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