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INDUSTRY REVIEWNON-RENEWABLE POWER GENERATION


need for more such plants,” he suggested. The “political and unpredictable” nature


of the nuclear power sector referred to by Martinez is currently particularly apparent in the UK, where Japanese conglomerate Hitachi indefinitely suspended work on a new USD17 billion nuclear power plant (Wylfa Newydd) in north Wales and a second project in Gloucestershire, due to cost and economic viability concerns. Just months earlier, another Japanese


group, Toshiba, announced it was not going ahead with the construction of a planned nuclear power station in Cumbria, northwestern UK. On the plus side, as far as UK nuclear


power plant development is concerned, work is now well under way on another major project, the USD26 billion Hinkley Point C installation being built by French energy group EDF.


Nuclear mixed fortunes Other examples of the continuing mixed fortunes of the nuclear power industry are apparent in Turkey. Logistics Plus’ Erdil explained: “Turkey has no operational nuclear power plants yet, but in 2010 it put pen to paper with the Russian government for the first one, the Akkuyu nuclear power plant [currently under construction]. “Three years later, Turkey also signed a


USD22 billion deal with Japanese group Mitsubishi Heavy Industries for the construction of the Sinop nuclear power plant. However, that project was subsequently abandoned in 2018 due to construction costs having almost doubled to approximately USD44 billion, largely because of post-Fukushima safety improvements and the fall in the value of the Turkish lira.” Elsewhere in the world, though, added


Erdil, the nuclear sector received a significant boost earlier this year when India and the USA confirmed plans to build six American nuclear power plants in India. “So globally, the project cargo industry is not done yet with the nuclear power plant market.” Other recent positive news on the new


nuclear power plant sector included confirmation late last year that India plans to go ahead with the construction of what is said to be the world’s largest such installation, with an eventual output capacity of 9.6 GW, at Jaitapur on its west coast. “That mix of news serves to highlight


the continuing unpredictable nature of the nuclear power plant project market as a whole,” commented Stijn Sarens, key


44 May/June 2019


Turkey has no operational nuclear power plants yet, but in 2010 it put pen to paper with the Russian government for the first one, the Akkuyu nuclear power plant [currently


under construction]. – Bahadir Erdil, Logistics Plus


Silamas Group last year deployed Goldhofer modules to transport and load two 1,905- tonne gas scrubbers that were destined for the Takehara coal- fired power station in Japan.


account manager, power plant segment for Sarens, a worldwide provider of crane rental, heavy lifting and engineered transport whose current business in the sector includes working on the Hinkley Point C project. In fact, at the time of writing, the


Belgium-based company was in the process


of mobilising its newly built 5,000-tonne lifting capacity giant crane, SGC-250, to the project site. Once operational, the machine is scheduled to lift more than 600 pieces for the plant, including the five major parts of each unit’s steel containment liner and dome.


Business potential More generally, Stijn Sarens also highlighted the wider business potential of the global nuclear power plant sector. “It is a very particular market and there are fewer companies around that can provide the sort of top-end heavy lift equipment required for the construction of the larger nuclear plants,” he explained. Overall, though, the non-renewable


energies sector of the power generation market remains a difficult one to predict, with a wider range of factors influencing future logistics business trends than in some other major markets. “If you look at the oil and gas industry,


for example, demand tends to be driven globally. However, demand for additional power and the urgency with which it has to be delivered is driven by the particular country involved,” explained Antonov Airlines’ Witton. “Added to that is the question of whether


that country has the financial resources to increase power output by itself or whether it needs to bring in investment from elsewhere – and if so, where from?”


HLPFI www.heavyliftpfi.com


Goldhofer


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